LITTLE MANILA IS IN THE HEART THE MAKING OF THE FILIPINA O AMERICAN COMMUNITY IN STOCKTON CALIFORNIA

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Little Manila Is In The Heart

Author : Dawn Bohulano Mabalon
ISBN : 9780822395744
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 40.3 MB
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In the early twentieth century—not long after 1898, when the United States claimed the Philippines as an American colony—Filipinas/os became a vital part of the agricultural economy of California's fertile San Joaquin Delta. In downtown Stockton, they created Little Manila, a vibrant community of hotels, pool halls, dance halls, restaurants, grocery stores, churches, union halls, and barbershops. Little Manila was home to the largest community of Filipinas/os outside of the Philippines until the neighborhood was decimated by urban redevelopment in the 1960s. Narrating a history spanning much of the twentieth century, Dawn Bohulano Mabalon traces the growth of Stockton's Filipina/o American community, the birth and eventual destruction of Little Manila, and recent efforts to remember and preserve it. Mabalon draws on oral histories, newspapers, photographs, personal archives, and her own family's history in Stockton. She reveals how Filipina/o immigrants created a community and ethnic culture shaped by their identities as colonial subjects of the United States, their racialization in Stockton as brown people, and their collective experiences in the fields and in the Little Manila neighborhood. In the process, Mabalon places Filipinas/os at the center of the development of California agriculture and the urban West.
Category: Social Science

Filipinos In Stockton

Author : Dawn B. Mabalon, Ph.D.
ISBN : 0738556246
Genre : History
File Size : 33.6 MB
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The first Filipino settlers arrived in Stockton, California, around 1898, and through most of the 20th century, this city was home to the largest community of Filipinos outside the Philippines. Because countless Filipinos worked in, passed through, and settled here, it became the crossroads of Filipino America. Yet immigrants were greeted with signs that read "Positively No Filipinos Allowed" and were segregated to a four-block area centered on Lafayette and El Dorado Streets, which they called "Little Manila." In the 1970s, redevelopment and the Crosstown Freeway decimated the Little Manila neighborhood. Despite these barriers, Filipino Americans have created a vibrant ethnic community and a rich cultural legacy. Filipino immigrants and their descendants have shaped the history, culture, and economy of the San Joaquin Delta area.
Category: History

Empire Of Care

Author : Catherine Ceniza Choy
ISBN : 082233089X
Genre : Medical
File Size : 51.5 MB
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An interdisciplinary examination of how the migration of nurses from the Philippines to the U.S. is inextricably linked to American imperialism and the U.S. colonization of the Philippine Islands in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
Category: Medical

Filipino American Lives

Author : Yen Le Espiritu
ISBN : 1439905576
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 54.51 MB
Format : PDF
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First person narratives by Filipino Americans reveal the range of their experiences-before and after immigration.
Category: Biography & Autobiography

America Is In The Heart

Author : Carlos Bulosan
ISBN : 9780295801070
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 20.26 MB
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First published in 1946, this autobiography of the well-known Filipino poet describes his boyhood in the Philippines, his voyage to America, and his years of hardship and despair as an itinerant laborer following the harvest trail in the rural West.
Category: Biography & Autobiography

Growing Up Brown

Author : Peter M. Jamero, Sr.
ISBN : 9780295802145
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 42.66 MB
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"I may have been like other boys, but there was a major difference -- my family included 80 to 100 single young men residing in a Filipino farm-labor camp. It was as a �campo� boy that I first learned of my ancestral roots and the sometimes tortuous path that Filipinos took in sailing halfway around the world to the promise that was America. It was as a campo boy that I first learned the values of family, community, hard work, and education. As a campo boy, I also began to see the two faces of America, a place where Filipinos were at once welcomed and excluded, were considered equal and were discriminated against. It was a place where the values of fairness and freedom often fell short when Filipinos put them to the test.�"-- Peter Jamero Peter Jamero�s story of hardship and success illuminates the experience of what he calls the �bridge generation� -- the American-born children of the Filipinos recruited as farm workers in the 1920s and 30s. Their experiences span the gap between these early immigrants and those Filipinos who owe their U.S. residency to the liberalization of immigration laws in 1965. His book is a sequel of sorts to Carlos Bulosan�s America Is in the Heart, with themes of heartbreaking struggle against racism and poverty and eventual triumph. Jamero describes his early life in a farm-labor camp in Livingston, California, and the path that took him, through naval service and graduate school, far beyond Livingston. A longtime community activist and civic leader, Jamero describes decades of toil and progress before the Filipino community entered the sociopolitical mainstream. He shares a wealth of anecdotes and reflections from his career as an executive of health and human service programs in Sacramento, Washington, D.C., Seattle, and San Francisco.
Category: Social Science

Filipinos In San Francisco

Author : Filipino American National Historical Society
ISBN : 9781439625248
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 36.37 MB
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Tens of thousands of Filipinos who have lived, worked, and raised families for over five generations in this unique city stake their rightful claim to more than a century of shared history in San Francisco. The photographs herein attest to the early arrivals, who came as merchant mariners, businesspeople, scholars, and musicians, as well as agricultural and domestic workers. But their story has often been ignored, told incompletely by others, and edited too selectively by many. The Filipino American experience both epitomizes and defies the traditional immigrant storyline, and these pictures honestly and respectfully document the fruits of their labors, the products of their perseverance, and, at times, their resistance to social exclusion and economic suppression.
Category: Social Science

Genthe S Photographs Of San Francisco S Old Chinatown

Author : Arnold Genthe
ISBN : 9780486140698
Genre : Photography
File Size : 88.63 MB
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130 rare photos offer fascinating visual record of Chinatown before the great 1906 earthquake. Informative text traces history of Chinese in California.
Category: Photography

Positively No Filipinos Allowed

Author : Antonio T. Tiongson
ISBN : 1592131239
Genre : History
File Size : 47.38 MB
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Essays challenging conventional narratives of Filipino American history and culture.
Category: History

The Making Of Asian America

Author : Erika Lee
ISBN : 9781476739410
Genre : History
File Size : 20.76 MB
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"The definitive history of Asian Americans by one of the nation's preeminent scholars on the subject. In the past fifty years, Asian Americans have helped change the face of America and are now the fastest growing group in the United States. But as award-winning historian Erika Lee reminds us, Asian Americans also have deep roots in the country. The Making of Asian America tells the little-known history of Asian Americans and their role in American life, from the arrival of the first Asians in the Americas to the present-day. An epic history of global journeys and new beginnings, this book shows how generations of Asian immigrants and their American-born descendants have made and remade Asian American life in the United States: sailors who came on the first trans-Pacific ships in the 1500s; indentured "coolies" who worked alongside African slaves in the Caribbean; and Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Korean, and South Asian immigrants who were recruited to work in the United States only to face massive racial discrimination, Asian exclusion laws, and for Japanese Americans, incarceration during World War II. Over the past fifty years, a new Asian America has emerged out of community activism and the arrival of new immigrants and refugees. No longer a "despised minority," Asian Americans are now held up as America's "model minorities" in ways that reveal the complicated role that race still plays in the United States. Published to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the passage of the United States' Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 that has remade our "nation of immigrants," this is a new and definitive history of Asian Americans. But more than that, it is a new way of understanding America itself, its complicated histories of race and immigration, and its place in the world today"--
Category: History