Leadership The Eleanor Roosevelt Way

Author : Robin Gerber
ISBN : 9781101551172
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 29.76 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
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Eleanor Roosevelt's remarkable ability to confront and overcome hurdles-be they political, personal, or social-made her one of the greatest leaders of the last century, if not all time. In Leadership the Eleanor Roosevelt Way, author and scholar Robin Gerber examines the values, tactics, and beliefs that enabled Eleanor Roosevelt to bring about tremendous change-in herself and in the world. Examining the former first lady's rise from a difficult childhood to her enormously productive and politically involved years in the White House, as a U.N. delegate and an honorary ambassador, an author, and beyond, Gerber offers women an inspiring road map to heroic living and an unparalleled model for personal achievement.
Category: Political Science

50 Success Classics

Author : Tom Butler-Bowdon
ISBN : 1857884760
Genre : Self-Help
File Size : 46.93 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 387
Read : 879

Discover the all-time classic books that have helped millions of people achieve success in their work and personal lives.
Category: Self-Help

Emotional Terrors In The Workplace Protecting Your Business Bottom Line

Author : Vali Hawkins Mitchell, Ph.d.
ISBN : 1931332274
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 68.77 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 538
Read : 964

Reasonable variations of human emotions are expected at the workplace. People have feelings. Emotions that accumulate, collect force, expand in volume and begin to spin are another matter entirely. Spinning emotions can become as unmanageable as a tornado, and in the workplace they can cause just as much damage in terms of human distress and economic disruption.All people have emotions. Normal people and abnormal people have emotions. Emotions happen at home and at work. So, understanding how individuals or groups respond emotionally in a business situation is important in order to have a complete perspective of human beings in a business function. Different people have different sets of emotions. Some people let emotions roll off their back like water off a duck. Other people swallow emotions and hold them in until they become toxic waste that needs a disposal site. Some have small simple feelings and others have large, complicated emotions. Stresses of life tickle our emotions or act as fuses in a time bomb. Stress triggers emotion. Extreme stress complicates the wide range of varying emotional responses. Work is a stressor. Sometimes work is an extreme stressor.Since everyone has emotion, it is important to know what kinds of emotion are regular and what kinds are irregular, abnormal, or damaging within the business environment. To build a strong, well-grounded, value-added set of references for professional discussions and planning for Emotional Continuity Management a manager needs to know at least the basics about human emotion. Advanced knowledge is preferable.Emotional Continuity Management planning for emotions that come from the stress caused by changes inside business, from small adjustments to catastrophic upheavals, requires knowing emotional and humanity-based needs and functions of people and not just technology and performance data. Emergency and Disaster Continuity planners sometimes posit the questions, ?What if during a disaster your computer is working, but no one shows up to use it? What if no one is working the computer because they are terrified to show up to a worksite devastated by an earthquake or bombing and they stay home to care for their children?? The Emotional Continuity Manager asks, ?What if no one is coming or no one is producing even if they are at the site because they are grieving or anticipating the next wave of danger? What happens if employees are engaged in emotional combat with another employee through gossip, innuendo, or out-and-out verbal warfare? And what if the entire company is in turmoil because we have an Emotional Terrorist who is just driving everyone bonkers?" The answer is that, in terms of bottom-line thinking, productivity is productivity ? and if your employees are not available because their emotions are not calibrated to your industry standards, then fiscal risks must be considered. Human compassion needs are important. And so is money.Employees today face the possibility of biological, nuclear, incendiary, chemical, explosive, or electronic catastrophe while potentially working in the same cubicle with someone ready to suicide over personal issues at home. They face rumors of downsizing and outsourcing while watching for anthrax amidst rumors that co-workers are having affairs. An employee coughs, someone jokes nervously about SARS, or teases a co-worker about their hamburger coming from a Mad Cow, someone laughs, someone worries, and productivity can falter as minds are not on tasks. Emotions run rampant in human lives and therefore at work sites. High-demand emotions demonstrated by complicated workplace relationships, time-consuming divorce proceedings, addiction behaviors, violence, illness, and death are common issues at work sites which people either manage well ? or do not manage well. Low-demand emotions demonstrated by annoyances, petty bickering, competition, prejudice, bias, minor power struggles, health variables, politics and daily grind feelings take up mental space as well as emotional space. It is reasonable to assume that dramatic effects from a terrorist attack, natural disaster, disgruntled employee shooting, or natural death at the work site would create emotional content. That content can be something that develops, evolves and resolves, or gathers speed and force like a tornado to become a spinning energy event with a life of its own. Even smaller events, such as a fully involved gossip chain or a computer upgrade can lead to the voluntary or involuntary exit of valuable employees. This can add energy to an emotional spin and translate into real risk features such as time loss, recruitment nightmares, disruptions in customer service, additional management hours, remediations and trainings, consultation fees, Employee Assistance Program (EAP) dollars spent, Human Resources (HR) time spent, administrative restructuring, and expensive and daunting litigations. Companies that prepare for the full range of emotions and therefore emotional risks, from annoyance to catastrophe, are better equipped to adjust to any emotionally charged event, small or large. It is never a question of if something will happen to disrupt the flow of productivity, it is only a question of when and how large.Emotions that ebb and flow are functional in the workplace. A healthy system should be able to manage the ups and downs of emotions. Emotions directly affect the continuity of production and services, customer and vendor relations and essential infrastructure. Unstable emotional infrastructure in the workplace disrupts business through such measurable costs as medical and mental health care, employee retention and retraining costs, time loss, or legal fees. Emotional Continuity Management is reasonably simple for managers when they are provided the justifiable concepts, empirical evidence that the risks are real, a set of correct tools and instructions in their use. What has not been easy until recently has been convincing the ?powers that be? that it is value-added work to deal directly and procedurally with emotions in the workplace. Businesses haven?t seen emotions as part of the working technology and have done everything they can do to avoid the topic. Now, cutting-edge companies are turning the corner. Even technology continuity managers are talking about human resources benefits and scrambling to find ways to evaluate feelings and risks. Yes, times are changing. Making a case for policy to manage emotions is now getting easier. For all the pain and horror associated with the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, employers are getting the message that no one is immune to crisis. In today''''s heightened security environments the demands of managing complex workplace emotions have increased beyond the normal training supplied by in-house Human Resources (HR) professionals and Employee Assistance Plans (EAPs). Many extremely well-meaning HR and EAP providers just do not have a necessary training to manage the complicated strata of extreme emotional responses. Emotions at work today go well beyond the former standards of HR and EAP training. HR and EAP providers now must have advanced trauma management training to be prepared to support employees. The days of easy emotional management are over. Life and work is much too complicated.Significant emotions from small to extreme are no longer the sole domain of HR, EAP, or even emergency first responders and counselors. Emotions are spinning in the very midst of your team, project, cubicle, and company. Emotions are not just at the scene of a disaster. Emotions are present. And because they are not ?controllable,? human emotions are not subject to being mandated. Emotions are going to happen.There are many times when emotions cannot be simply outsourced to an external provider of services. There are many times that a manager will face an extreme emotional reaction. Distressed people will require management regularly. That?s your job
Category: Business & Economics

Leadership Challenge

Author : James M. Kouzes
ISBN : 3527503749
Genre : Executive ability
File Size : 35.29 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Through research, interviews and the experience of hundreds of managers, Kouzes and Posner show how leadership can be learned and mastered by all. Readable, interesting, and up-to-date. Highly recommended.--Library Journal.
Category: Executive ability

Military Law Review

Author :
ISBN : STANFORD:36105063234616
Genre : Courts-martial and courts of inquiry
File Size : 73.38 MB
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Category: Courts-martial and courts of inquiry

The Art Of Business

Author : Emery H. Mikel
ISBN : 9780857007728
Genre : Psychology
File Size : 76.85 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 407
Read : 929

Working as an independent contractor or in private practice is often the ideal scenario for creative therapists who want to control their own career and make decisions about the jobs and clients they take on. This practical guide to successful self-employment takes you through every step of the process, from coming up with the idea and marketing yourself, finding jobs, and interviewing, to maintaining jobs and what happens when you or your client want to end the job. Each chapter is packed with practical information and illustrative stories from the author's extensive experience of setting up her own art therapy business, considering all the likely obstacles you may face, and covering topics such as ethics and interns. This accessible companion contains all the information a creative therapist who wants to find work as an independent contractor will need to get started. It will be suitable for any level of experience and all creative therapists, including art, music, drama and dance therapists.
Category: Psychology

American First Ladies

Author : Robert P. Watson
ISBN : WISC:89082491333
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 84.3 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
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Provides a biographical essay on each of the First Ladies, from Martha Washington to Laura Bush, including family members who served as First Lady for bachelor or widowed Presidents, and includes overviews of the widely varied roles they have played.
Category: Biography & Autobiography

Interchange

Author :
ISBN : CORNELL:31924092642473
Genre : Railroads
File Size : 70.71 MB
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Category: Railroads

Who S The Boss

Author : Hans Krabbendam
ISBN : IND:30000087923649
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 37.27 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Is the present popularity of leadership studies an echo of the status of the U.S. as the leader of the free world, or is it hype created by smart entrepreneurs? Have current leadership concepts emerged from the democratic environment in America or do they reflect a globalist and timeless approach? How do leadership studies reflect national values, such as individualism and competition, success, commonly associated with American culture? An international group of scholars of American society seeks to answer these questions in this volume. They critically examine the terminology and the explanatory power of various leadership concepts. These essays show that the promises of "good" leadership to protect democratic processes against political and commercial exploitation are often too optimistic. Examples from military academies, state politics, marginal groups, and African American politicians dampen high expectations for new visionary political leadership in the United States.
Category: Political Science