Laboring Women

Author : Jennifer L. Morgan
ISBN : 9780812206371
Genre : History
File Size : 33.94 MB
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When black women were brought from Africa to the New World as slave laborers, their value was determined by their ability to work as well as their potential to bear children, who by law would become the enslaved property of the mother's master. In Laboring Women: Reproduction and Gender in New World Slavery, Jennifer L. Morgan examines for the first time how African women's labor in both senses became intertwined in the English colonies. Beginning with the ideological foundations of racial slavery in early modern Europe, Laboring Women traverses the Atlantic, exploring the social and cultural lives of women in West Africa, slaveowners' expectations for reproductive labor, and women's lives as workers and mothers under colonial slavery. Challenging conventional wisdom, Morgan reveals how expectations regarding gender and reproduction were central to racial ideologies, the organization of slave labor, and the nature of slave community and resistance. Taking into consideration the heritage of Africans prior to enslavement and the cultural logic of values and practices recreated under the duress of slavery, she examines how women's gender identity was defined by their shared experiences as agricultural laborers and mothers, and shows how, given these distinctions, their situation differed considerably from that of enslaved men. Telling her story through the arc of African women's actual lives—from West Africa, to the experience of the Middle Passage, to life on the plantations—she offers a thoughtful look at the ways women's reproductive experience shaped their roles in communities and helped them resist some of the more egregious effects of slave life. Presenting a highly original, theoretically grounded view of reproduction and labor as the twin pillars of female exploitation in slavery, Laboring Women is a distinctive contribution to the literature of slavery and the history of women.
Category: History

Women In Early America

Author : Thomas A. Foster
ISBN : 9781479874545
Genre : History
File Size : 39.58 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
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Women in Early America, edited by Thomas A. Foster, tells the fascinating stories of the myriad women who shaped the early modern North American world from the colonial era through the first years of the Republic. This volume goes beyond the familiar stories of Pocahontas or Abigail Adams, recovering the lives and experiences of lesser-known women—both ordinary and elite, enslaved and free, Indigenous and immigrant—who lived and worked in not only British mainland America, but also New Spain, New France, New Netherlands, and the West Indies. In these essays we learn about the conditions that women faced during the Salem witchcraft panic and the Spanish Inquisition in New Mexico; as indentured servants in early Virginia and Maryland; caught up between warring British and Native Americans; as traders in New Netherlands and Detroit; as slave owners in Jamaica; as Loyalist women during the American Revolution; enslaved in the President’s house; and as students and educators inspired by the air of equality in the young nation. Foster showcases the latest research of junior and senior historians, drawing from recent scholarship informed by women’s and gender history—feminist theory, gender theory, new cultural history, social history, and literary criticism. Collectively, these essays address the need for scholarship on women’s lives and experiences. Women in Early America heeds the call of feminist scholars to not merely reproduce male-centered narratives, “add women, and stir,” but to rethink master narratives themselves so that we may better understand how women and men created and developed our historical past. Instructor's Guide
Category: History

Women And Slavery In America

Author : Catherine M. Lewis
ISBN : 9781610754774
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 77.8 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
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Women and Slavery offers readers an opportunity to examine the establishment, growth, and evolution of slavery in the United States as it impacted women-enslaved and free, African American and white, wealthy and poor, northern and southern. The primary documents-including newspaper articles, broadsides, cartoons, pamphlets, speeches, photographs, memoirs, and editorials-are organized thematically and represent cultural, political, religious, economic, and social perspectives on this dark and complex period in American history.
Category: Social Science

Free At Last Reflections On Freedom And The Abolition Of The British Transatlantic Slave Trade

Author : Cecily Jones
ISBN : 9781443831130
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 46.50 MB
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The global commemorative events of 2007 that marked the bicentennial anniversary of the parliamentary abolition of the African slave trade provided opportunity for widespread discussion between politicians, community groups, museums and heritage organisations, the clergy, and scholars, as to the meanings of colonial and post-colonial freedom. As was evident from the tensions emerging from those debates, the subject of the transatlantic slave trade and slavery remains highly charged, as does the extent to which its legacy of racism, predicated on theoretical assumptions of European cultural, social, political and economic superiority, continues to maintain and reproduce complex systems of inequalities between peoples and societies. Free at Last? is an edited collection of interdisciplinary perspectives that critically reflects on the struggles of enslaved peoples and anti-slavery activists to effect the abolition of the British slave trade, as well as the post-abolition global legacies of those diverse struggles for equality. The chapters bring together multiple narratives and discourses about the British abolition to reflect critically and comparatively on: the boundaries between slavery and freedom; the contestations and championing of freedom; and the legacies of slavery and abolition in the contemporary context.
Category: Social Science

Converging Worlds

Author : Louise A. Breen
ISBN : 9781136596742
Genre : History
File Size : 82.79 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
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Providing a survey of colonial American history both regionally broad and "Atlantic" in coverage, Converging Worlds presents the most recent research in an accessible manner for undergraduate students. With chapters written by top-notch scholars, Converging Worlds is unique in providing not only a comprehensive chronological approach to colonial history with attention to thematic details, but a window into the relevant historiography. Each historian also selected several documents to accompany their chapter, found in the companion primary source reader. Converging Worlds: Communities and Cultures in Colonial America includes: timelines tailored for every chapter chapter summaries discussion questions lists of further reading, introducing students to specialist literature fifty illustrations. Key topics discussed include: French, Spanish, and Native American experiences regional areas such as the Midwest and Southwest religion including missions, witchcraft, and Protestants the experience of women and families. With its synthesis of both broad time periods and specific themes, Converging Worlds is ideal for students of the colonial period, and provides a fascinating glimpse into the diverse foundations of America. For additional information and classroom resources please visit the Converging Worlds companion website at www.routledge.com/textbooks/9780415964999.
Category: History

Love Of Freedom

Author : Catherine Adams
ISBN : 019977983X
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 75.96 MB
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They baked New England's Thanksgiving pies, preached their faith to crowds of worshippers, spied for the patriots during the Revolution, wrote that human bondage was a sin, and demanded reparations for slavery. Black women in colonial and revolutionary New England sought not only legal emancipation from slavery but defined freedom more broadly to include spiritual, familial, and economic dimensions. Hidden behind the banner of achieving freedom was the assumption that freedom meant affirming black manhood The struggle for freedom in New England was different for men than for women. Black men in colonial and revolutionary New England were struggling for freedom from slavery and for the right to patriarchal control of their own families. Women had more complicated desires, seeking protection and support in a male headed household while also wanting personal liberty. Eventually women who were former slaves began to fight for dignity and respect for womanhood and access to schooling for black children.
Category: Social Science

Faithful Bodies

Author : Heather Miyano Kopelson
ISBN : 9781479852345
Genre : History
File Size : 76.41 MB
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In the seventeenth-century English Atlantic, religious beliefs and practices played a central role in creating racial identity. English Protestantism provided a vocabulary and structure to describe and maintain boundaries between insider and outsider. In this path-breaking study, Heather Miyano Kopelson peels back the layers of conflicting definitions of bodies and competing practices of faith in the puritan Atlantic, demonstrating how the categories of “white,” “black,” and “Indian” developed alongside religious boundaries between “Christian” and “heathen” and between “Catholic” and “Protestant.” Faithful Bodies focuses on three communities of Protestant dissent in the Atlantic World: Bermuda, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island. In this “puritan Atlantic,” religion determined insider and outsider status: at times Africans and Natives could belong as long as they embraced the Protestant faith, while Irish Catholics and English Quakers remained suspect. Colonists’ interactions with indigenous peoples of the Americas and with West Central Africans shaped their understandings of human difference and its acceptable boundaries. Prayer, religious instruction, sexual behavior, and other public and private acts became markers of whether or not blacks and Indians were sinning Christians or godless heathens. As slavery became law, transgressing people of color counted less and less as sinners in English puritans’ eyes, even as some of them made Christianity an integral part of their communities. As Kopelson shows, this transformation proceeded unevenly but inexorably during the long seventeenth century.
Category: History

New West Indian Guide

Author :
ISBN : IND:30000125137897
Genre : Caribbean Area
File Size : 68.58 MB
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Category: Caribbean Area

America History And Life

Author :
ISBN : STANFORD:36105133520721
Genre : Canada
File Size : 81.13 MB
Format : PDF
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Article abstracts and citations of reviews and dissertations covering the United States and Canada.
Category: Canada