JOHN BOWLBY FROM PSYCHOANALYSIS TO ETHOLOGY UNRAVELLING THE ROOTS OF ATTACHMENT THEORY

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John Bowlby From Psychoanalysis To Ethology

Author : Frank C. P. van der Horst
ISBN : 1119996260
Genre : Psychology
File Size : 85.53 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 254
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This accessible book draws on unique evidence from oral histories and little-known archive material to shed new light on the working relationships which led to John Bowlby’s shift from psychoanalysis to ethology as a frame of reference – and ultimately to the development of attachment theory. A unique exploration of the origins of Bowlby’s ideas and the critical transformation in his thinking – offers an alternative to standard accounts of the origin of attachment theory Explores the significance of Bowlby’s influential working relationships with Robert Hinde, Harry Harlow, James Robertson and Mary Ainsworth Provides students, academics, and practitioners with clear insights into the development of attachment theory Accessible to general readers interested in psychology and psychoanalysis
Category: Psychology

Narcissistic Parenting In An Insecure World

Author : Harry Hendrick
ISBN : 9781447322566
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 23.60 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
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Harry Hendrick shows how broader social changes, including neoliberalism, feminism, the collapse of the social-democratic ideal, and the 'new behaviourism', have led to the rise of the anxious and narcissistic parent, In this provocative history of parenting.
Category: Political Science

Happier

Author : Daniel Horowitz
ISBN : 9780190655662
Genre : Psychology
File Size : 20.7 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 328
Read : 796

When a cultural movement that began to take shape in the mid-twentieth century erupted into mainstream American culture in the late 1990s, it brought to the fore the idea that it is as important to improve one's own sense of pleasure as it is to manage depression and anxiety. Cultural historian Daniel Horowitz's research reveals that this change happened in the context of key events. World War II, the Holocaust, post-war prosperity, the rise of counter-culture, the crises of the 1970s, the presidency of Ronald Reagan, and the prime ministerships of Margaret Thatcher and David Cameron provided the important context for the development of the field today known as positive psychology. Happier? provides the first history of the origins, development, and impact of the way Americans -- and now many around the world -- shifted from mental illness to well-being as they pondered the human condition. This change, which came about from the fusing of knowledge drawn from Eastern spiritual traditions, behavioral economics, neuroscience, evolutionary biology, and cognitive psychology, has been led by scholars and academic entrepreneurs, as they wrestled with the implications of political events and forces such as neoliberalism and cultural conservatism, and a public eager for self-improvement. Linking the development of happiness studies and positive psychology with a broad series of social changes, including the emergence of new media and technologies like TED talks, blogs, web sites, and neuroscience, as well as the role of evangelical ministers, Oprah Winfrey's enterprises, and funding from government agencies and private foundations, Horowitz highlights the transfer of specialized knowledge into popular arenas. Along the way he shows how marketing triumphed, transforming academic disciplines and spirituality into saleable products. Ultimately, Happier? illuminates how positive psychology, one of the most influential academic fields of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, infused American culture with captivating promises for a happier society.
Category: Psychology