JEWS OF THE PACIFIC COAST

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Jews Of The Pacific Coast

Author : Ellen Eisenberg
ISBN : UCSD:31822036453256
Genre : History
File Size : 90.63 MB
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From the California Gold Rush of 1849 to the explosion of population centers in the Southwest in the 1980s, Jews have played a significant role in shaping the Pacific West. Through their mercantile networks, cultural innovations, philanthropic institutions, and political leadership, western Jews created a distinctive identity. In Jews of the Pacific Coast, Ellen Eisenberg, Ava F. Kahn, and William Toll have joined together to write the first interpretive history of the Jews of this region.--In the West, Jewish men and women were less restricted in their pursuits than they had been in Europe or in the eastern United States. Unlike in the East, where Jews arriving in large numbers had to accommodate themselves to preexisting local elites and Jewish communities, in the Pacific West they were full participants in the civic lives of new and rapidly developing societies.--Drawing on manuscript collections, oral histories, newspapers, and private papers, the authors examine the distinctive roles that Jews played in the Pacific West, especially the innovative roles of women. Personal stories and anecdotes give the authors the opportunity to compare and contrast the nature of the Jewish experience in Seattle, Portland, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and the small towns of the West. They explain the important differences among these cities, the significance of the regional shift of focus in the early twentieth century from San Francisco to Los Angeles, and, after 1960, the importance of Jewish contributions to new population centers like Las Vegas.--Ellen Eisenberg, Dwight and Margaret Lear Professor of American History at Willamette University, is the author of The First to Cry Down Injustice? Western Jews and Japanese Removal during WWII, a 2008 National Jewish Book Award finalist. --Ava F. Kahn is the editor of Jewish Voices of the California Gold Rush and Jewish Life in the American West and co-editor of California Jews. --William Toll teaches American Jewish history at the University of Oregon and is the author of The Making of an Ethnic Middle Class: Portland Jewry Over Four Generations.--"Jews of the Pacific Coast embraces the entire Pacific West. It places the Jewish experience within a regional context; it highlights points of regional distinctiveness; and it makes the case for a more nuanced, regional approach to the American Jewish experience as a whole." -Jonathan D. Sarna, Brandeis University--"Jews of the Pacific Coast adds significantly to the understanding of Judaism in the West and will be an important book for anyone trying to understand the larger contours of religion on the West Coast." -Dale Soden, Whitworth University-
Category: History

Cosmopolitans

Author : Fred Rosenbaum
ISBN : 9780520945029
Genre : Religion
File Size : 49.68 MB
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Levi Strauss, A.L. Gump, Yehudi Menuhin, Gertrude Stein, Adolph Sutro, Congresswoman Florence Prag Kahn--Jewish people have been so enmeshed in life in and around San Francisco that their story is a chronicle of the metropolis itself. Since the Gold Rush, Bay Area Jews have countered stereotypes, working as farmers and miners, boxers and mountaineers. They were Gold Rush pioneers, Gilded Age tycoons, and Progressive Era reformers. Told through an astonishing range of characters and events, Cosmopolitans illuminates many aspects of Jewish life in the area: the high profile of Jewish women, extraordinary achievements in the business world, the cultural creativity of the second generation, the bitter debate about the proper response to the Holocaust and Zionism, and much more. Focusing in rich detail on the first hundred years after the Gold Rush, the book also takes the story up to the present day, demonstrating how unusually strong affinities for the arts and for the struggle for social justice have characterized this community even as it has changed over time. Cosmopolitans, set in the uncommonly diverse Bay Area, is a truly unique chapter of the Jewish experience in America.
Category: Religion

Jewish San Francisco

Author : Edward Zerin
ISBN : 9781439618172
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 35.24 MB
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In San Francisco, the "instant city" of the gold rush days, Jews were pioneers among pioneers. Some came as immigrants directly from Europe, others as resettled adventurers from the East Coast, and still others as scions of southern Sephardic families. Out of this mixed multitude emerged a community with synagogues and institutions to care for the needy and the sick, along with a dignified social fabric. New immigrants following the Russian pogroms of 1883 were absorbed, and the ashen ruins from the 1906 earthquake were rebuilt. The city's cultural treasures and social needs were enriched, and the city's Jews were nurtured by civic commitments. Today's 70,000 San Francisco Jews, standing upon the shoulders of pioneering giants, continue to build and rebuild.
Category: Social Science

Germans Into Jews

Author : Sharon Gillerman
ISBN : 0804771405
Genre : History
File Size : 66.11 MB
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Germans into Jews turns to an often overlooked and misunderstood period of German and Jewish history—the years between the world wars. It has been assumed that the Jewish community in Germany was in decline during the Weimar Republic. But, Sharon Gillerman demonstrates that Weimar Jews sought to rejuvenate and reconfigure their community as a means both of strengthening the German nation and of creating a more expansive and autonomous Jewish entity within the German state. These ambitious projects to increase fertility, expand welfare, and strengthen the family transcended the ideological and religious divisions that have traditionally characterized Jewish communal life. Integrating Jewish history, German history, gender history, and social history, this book highlights the experimental and contingent nature of efforts by Weimar Jews to reassert a new Jewish particularism while simultaneously reinforcing their commitment to Germanness.
Category: History

Hitler In Los Angeles

Author : Steven J. Ross
ISBN : 9781620405642
Genre : History
File Size : 88.10 MB
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A 2018 FINALIST FOR THE PULITZER PRIZE The chilling, little-known story of the rise of Nazism in Los Angeles, and the Jewish leaders and spies they recruited who stopped it. No American city was more important to the Nazis than Los Angeles, home to Hollywood, the greatest propaganda machine in the world. The Nazis plotted to kill the city's Jews and to sabotage the nation's military installations: plans existed for hanging twenty prominent Hollywood figures such as Al Jolson, Charlie Chaplin, and Samuel Goldwyn; for driving through Boyle Heights and machine-gunning as many Jews as possible; and for blowing up defense installations and seizing munitions from National Guard armories along the Pacific Coast. U.S. law enforcement agencies were not paying close attention--preferring to monitor Reds rather than Nazis--and only Leon Lewis and his daring ring of spies stood in the way. From 1933 until the end of World War II, attorney Leon Lewis, the man Nazis would come to call "the most dangerous Jew in Los Angeles," ran a spy operation comprised of military veterans and their wives who infiltrated every Nazi and fascist group in Los Angeles. Often rising to leadership positions, this daring ring of spies uncovered and foiled the Nazi's disturbing plans for death and destruction. Featuring a large cast of Nazis, undercover agents, and colorful supporting players, Hitler in Los Angeles, by acclaimed historian Steven J. Ross, tells the story of Lewis's daring spy network in a time when hate groups had moved from the margins to the mainstream.
Category: History

Jews In The Los Angeles Mosaic

Author : Karen Wilson
ISBN : 9780520275508
Genre : History
File Size : 79.35 MB
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"This book is published in conjunction with the exhibition Jews in the Los Angeles Mosaic, organized by the Autry National Center of the American West."--Introduction.
Category: History

The Columbia History Of Jews And Judaism In America

Author : Marc Lee Raphael
ISBN : 9780231132237
Genre : Religion
File Size : 47.98 MB
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This collection focuses on a variety of important themes in the American Jewish and Judaic experience. It opens with essays on early Jewish settlers (1654-1820), the expansion of Jewish life in America (1820-1901), the great wave of eastern European Jewish immigrants (1880-1924), the character of American Judaism between the two world wars, American Jewish life from the end of World War II to the Six-Day War, and the growth of Jews' influence and affluence. The second half of the volume includes essays on Orthodox Jews, the history of Jewish education in America, the rise of Jewish social clubs at the turn of the century, the history of southern and western Jewry, Jewish responses to Nazism and the Holocaust, feminism's confrontation with Judaism, and the eternal question of what defines American Jewish culture. Original and elegantly crafted, The Columbia History of Jews and Judaism in America not only introduces the student to a thrilling history, but also provides the scholar with new perspectives and insights.
Category: Religion

Jewish Life In The American West

Author : Ava Fran Kahn
ISBN : 1890771775
Genre : History
File Size : 68.68 MB
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Puts aside many stereotypes and examines the less-told story of the migration of Jews to Californiaand the West from the mid-19th century to the 1920's
Category: History