JEWISH ROOTS IN SOUTHERN SOIL A NEW HISTORY BRANDEIS SERIES IN AMERICAN JEWISH HISTORY CULTURE AND LIFE

Download Jewish Roots In Southern Soil A New History Brandeis Series In American Jewish History Culture And Life ebook PDF or Read Online books in PDF, EPUB, and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to JEWISH ROOTS IN SOUTHERN SOIL A NEW HISTORY BRANDEIS SERIES IN AMERICAN JEWISH HISTORY CULTURE AND LIFE book pdf for free now.

Jewish Roots In Southern Soil

Author : Marcie Cohen Ferris
ISBN : 1584655895
Genre : History
File Size : 57.69 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 519
Read : 206

A lively look at southern Jewish history and culture.
Category: History

Lone Stars Of David

Author : Hollace Ava Weiner
ISBN : 9781584656227
Genre : History
File Size : 55.64 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 669
Read : 878

An essay collection of lively written, lavishly illustrated, and well-documented narratives on the history and culture of Texas Jews.
Category: History

A Portion Of The People

Author : Theodore Rosengarten
ISBN : 1570034451
Genre : Art
File Size : 55.65 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 689
Read : 924

In the year 1800, South Carolina was home to more Jews than any other place in North America. As old as the province of Carolina itself, the Jewish presence has been a vital but little-examined element in the growth of cities and towns, in the economy of slavery and post-slavery society, and in the creation of American Jewish religious identity. The record of a landmark exhibition that will change the way people think about Jewish history and American history, A Portion of the People: Three Hundred Years of Southern Jewish Life presents a remarkable group of art and cultural objects and a provocative investigation of the characters and circumstances that produced them. The book and exhibition are the products of a seven-year collaboration by the Jewish Historical Society of South Carolina, the McKissick Museum of the University of South Carolina, and the College of Charleston. Edited and introduced by Theodore Rosengarten, with original essays by Deborah Dash Moore, Jenna Weissman Joselit, Jack Bass, curator Dale Rosengarten, and Eli N. Evans, A Portion of the People is an important addition to southern arts and letters. A photographic essay by Bill Aron, who has documented Jewish
Category: Art

Dixie Diaspora

Author : Mark K. Bauman
ISBN : 0817315047
Genre : History
File Size : 33.6 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 723
Read : 195

This book is an anthology of essays designed to introduce readers to key issues in this growing field of scholarship and to encourage further study. Divided into five sections - 'Jews and Judaism,' 'Small Town Life,' 'Business and Governance,' 'Interactio
Category: History

German Rocketeers In The Heart Of Dixie

Author : Monique Laney
ISBN : 9780300213454
Genre : Science
File Size : 72.8 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 988
Read : 489

This thought-provoking study by historian Monique Laney focuses on the U.S. government–assisted integration of German rocket specialists and their families into a small southern community soon after World War II. In 1950, Wernher von Braun and his team of rocket experts relocated to Huntsville, Alabama, a town that would celebrate the team, despite their essential role in the recent Nazi war effort, for their contributions to the U.S. Army missile program and later to NASA’s space program. Based on oral histories, provided by members of the African American and Jewish communities, and by the rocketeers’ families, co-workers, friends, and neighbors, Laney’s book demonstrates how the histories of German Nazism and Jim Crow in the American South intertwine in narratives about the past. This is a critical reassessment of a singular time that links the Cold War, the Space Race, and the Civil Rights era while addressing important issues of transnational science and technology, and asking Americans to consider their country’s own history of racism when reflecting on the Nazi past.
Category: Science

Shalom Y All

Author : Bill Aron
ISBN : 9781565128293
Genre : History
File Size : 55.4 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 417
Read : 514

The kitchen of Henrietta Levine in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, where chopped liver is sautTing. Ben and Betty Lee Lamensdorf's farmland in Cary, Mississippi, where cotton, wheat, and pecans are harvested. The New Americans Social Club, a group of Holocaust survivors that meet regularly in New Orleans. The historic and flourishing Temple Emanu-El in Birmingham, Alabama. From Levy, Arkansas, to Kaplan, Louisiana, Southern Jewish culture is alive and well below the Mason-Dixon line. In Shalom Y'all, award-winning photographer Bill Aron provides a vibrant portrait of contemporary Jewish life, dutifully recording the heroic, funny, and sometimes tragic experiences of a people who have long settled in the Bible Belt. With a moving foreword by Alfred Uhry, author of Driving Miss Daisy, this book covers all aspects of the Jewish experience, from food (chopped liver, of course, but also bagels and grits) to occupations to religious practices to friendships. Together, the text and photographs tell a story of a culture that has managed, with a mixture of good humor, perseverance, and faith, to make a home.
Category: History

Becoming American Jews

Author : Meaghan Dwyer-Ryan
ISBN : 9781584657903
Genre : Religion
File Size : 44.89 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 668
Read : 1020

A compelling history of Boston s Temple Israel and its role in American Reform Judaism"
Category: Religion

Fight Against Fear

Author : Clive Webb
ISBN : 9780820340098
Genre : History
File Size : 61.97 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 204
Read : 680

In the uneasily shared history of Jews and blacks in America, the struggle for civil rights in the South may be the least understood episode. Fight against Fear is the first book to focus on Jews and African Americans in that remarkable place and time. Mindful of both communities' precarious and contradictory standings in the South, Clive Webb tells a complex story of resistance and complicity, conviction and apathy. Webb begins by ranging over the experiences of southern Jews up to the eve of the civil rights movement--from antebellum slaveowners to refugees who fled Hitler's Europe only to arrive in the Jim Crow South. He then shows how the historical burden of ambivalence between Jews and blacks weighed on such issues as school desegregation, the white massive resistance movement, and business boycotts and sit-ins. As many Jews grappled as never before with the ways they had become--and yet never could become--southerners, their empathy with African Americans translated into scattered, individual actions rather than any large-scale, organized alliance between the two groups. The reasons for this are clear, Webb says, once we get past the notion that the choices of the much larger, less conservative, and urban-centered Jewish populations of the North define those of all American Jews. To understand Jews in the South we must look at their particular circumstances: their small numbers and wide distribution, denominational rifts, and well-founded anxiety over defying racial and class customs set by the region's white Protestant majority. For better or worse, we continue to define the history of Jews and blacks in America by its flash points. By setting aside emotions and shallow perceptions, Fight against Fear takes a substantial step toward giving these two communities the more open and evenhanded consideration their shared experiences demand.
Category: History

Ten Days Of Birthright Israel

Author : Leonard Saxe
ISBN : 1584655410
Genre : Education
File Size : 44.81 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 900
Read : 767

The remarkable story of Birthright Israel, an intensive ten-day educational program designed to connect Jewish young adults to their heritage
Category: Education

The Jews Of New Orleans And The Mississippi Delta

Author : Emily Ford
ISBN : 9781614237341
Genre : History
File Size : 25.18 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 204
Read : 1295

The early days of Louisiana settlement brought with them a clandestine group of Jewish pioneers. Isaac Monsanto and other traders spited the rarely enforced Code Noir banning their occupancy, but it wasn't until the Louisiana Purchase that larger numbers colonized the area. Immigrants like the Sartorius brothers and Samuel Zemurray made their way from Central and Eastern Europe to settle the bayou country along the Mississippi. They made their homes in and around New Orleans and the Mississippi River delta, establishing congregations like that of Tememe Derech and B'Nai Israel, with the mighty river serving as a mode of transportation and communication, connecting the communities on both sides of the riverbank.
Category: History