JEWISH ROOTS IN SOUTHERN SOIL A NEW HISTORY BRANDEIS SERIES IN AMERICAN JEWISH HISTORY CULTURE AND LIFE

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Jewish Roots In Southern Soil

Author : Marcie Cohen Ferris
ISBN : 1584655895
Genre : History
File Size : 89.7 MB
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A lively look at southern Jewish history and culture.
Category: History

German Rocketeers In The Heart Of Dixie

Author : Monique Laney
ISBN : 9780300213454
Genre : Science
File Size : 42.67 MB
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This thought-provoking study by historian Monique Laney focuses on the U.S. government–assisted integration of German rocket specialists and their families into a small southern community soon after World War II. In 1950, Wernher von Braun and his team of rocket experts relocated to Huntsville, Alabama, a town that would celebrate the team, despite their essential role in the recent Nazi war effort, for their contributions to the U.S. Army missile program and later to NASA’s space program. Based on oral histories, provided by members of the African American and Jewish communities, and by the rocketeers’ families, co-workers, friends, and neighbors, Laney’s book demonstrates how the histories of German Nazism and Jim Crow in the American South intertwine in narratives about the past. This is a critical reassessment of a singular time that links the Cold War, the Space Race, and the Civil Rights era while addressing important issues of transnational science and technology, and asking Americans to consider their country’s own history of racism when reflecting on the Nazi past.
Category: Science

Dixie Diaspora

Author : Mark K. Bauman
ISBN : 0817315047
Genre : History
File Size : 46.96 MB
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This book is an anthology of essays designed to introduce readers to key issues in this growing field of scholarship and to encourage further study. Divided into five sections - 'Jews and Judaism,' 'Small Town Life,' 'Business and Governance,' 'Interactio
Category: History

Becoming American Jews

Author : Meaghan Dwyer-Ryan
ISBN : 9781584657903
Genre : Religion
File Size : 52.93 MB
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A compelling history of Boston s Temple Israel and its role in American Reform Judaism"
Category: Religion

A Portion Of The People

Author : Theodore Rosengarten
ISBN : 1570034451
Genre : Art
File Size : 74.46 MB
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In the year 1800, South Carolina was home to more Jews than any other place in North America. As old as the province of Carolina itself, the Jewish presence has been a vital but little-examined element in the growth of cities and towns, in the economy of slavery and post-slavery society, and in the creation of American Jewish religious identity. The record of a landmark exhibition that will change the way people think about Jewish history and American history, A Portion of the People: Three Hundred Years of Southern Jewish Life presents a remarkable group of art and cultural objects and a provocative investigation of the characters and circumstances that produced them. The book and exhibition are the products of a seven-year collaboration by the Jewish Historical Society of South Carolina, the McKissick Museum of the University of South Carolina, and the College of Charleston. Edited and introduced by Theodore Rosengarten, with original essays by Deborah Dash Moore, Jenna Weissman Joselit, Jack Bass, curator Dale Rosengarten, and Eli N. Evans, A Portion of the People is an important addition to southern arts and letters. A photographic essay by Bill Aron, who has documented Jewish
Category: Art

The Jewish 1960s

Author : Michael E. Staub
ISBN : STANFORD:36105114312676
Genre : History
File Size : 42.67 MB
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No American decade during the twentieth century has been so strongly defined by Jewish-led and Jewish-sponsored political activism or so deeply informed and influenced by Jewish culture as the 1960s. Nor has any decade in the last century had more lasting consequences on the contemporary state of America Jewry. The 1960s marked the rise of Jewish pride, witnessed a revitalization of religious communal commitments, and saw the revival of Jewish particularism as a crucial counterpoint to a liberal-left Jewish universalism. In these and other respects, Jews remade themselves as they transformed the nation in this critical period. The Jewish 1960s introduces a new generation of interested readers to some of the finest essays, speeches, and journalistic accounts by Jewish commentators, spokespersons, prominent rabbis, civil rights and antiwar activists, radical Zionists, feminists, counter-cultural leaders, and their critics from 1960 to the early 1970s. This volume brings together materials from Jews on the right as well as the left and chronicles, among other things, Jewish religious and ethnic renewal, the Jewish stand on civil rights, Jewish liberalism and the origins of Jewish neo-conservatism, American Jews' commitments to Israel, Jewish contributions to feminism and the gay and lesbian rights movements, and the evolution of Holocaust consciousness. Designed for course adoption, this volume contains a general introduction to the period as well as short section introductions to each of the book's thirteen chapters.
Category: History

That Pride Of Race And Character

Author : Caroline E. Light
ISBN : 9781479835775
Genre : History
File Size : 77.55 MB
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“It has ever been the boast of the Jewish people, that they support their own poor,” declared Kentucky attorney Benjamin Franklin Jonas in 1856. “Their reasons are partly founded in religious necessity, and partly in that pride of race and character which has supported them through so many ages of trial and vicissitude.” In That Pride of Race and Character, Caroline E. Light examines the American Jewish tradition of benevolence and charity and explores its southern roots. Light provides a critical analysis of benevolence as it was inflected by regional ideals of race and gender, showing how a southern Jewish benevolent empire emerged in response to the combined pressures of post-Civil War devastation and the simultaneous influx of eastern European immigration. In an effort to combat the voices of anti-Semitism and nativism, established Jewish leaders developed a sophisticated and cutting-edge network of charities in the South to ensure that Jews took care of those considered “their own” while also proving themselves to be exemplary white citizens. Drawing from confidential case files and institutional records from various southern Jewish charities, the book relates how southern Jewish leaders and their immigrant clients negotiated the complexities of “fitting in” in a place and time of significant socio-political turbulence. Ultimately, the southern Jewish call to benevolence bore the particular imprint of the region’s racial mores and left behind a rich legacy.
Category: History

The Jews Of New Orleans And The Mississippi Delta

Author : Emily Ford
ISBN : 9781614237341
Genre : History
File Size : 24.43 MB
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The early days of Louisiana settlement brought with them a clandestine group of Jewish pioneers. Isaac Monsanto and other traders spited the rarely enforced Code Noir banning their occupancy, but it wasn't until the Louisiana Purchase that larger numbers colonized the area. Immigrants like the Sartorius brothers and Samuel Zemurray made their way from Central and Eastern Europe to settle the bayou country along the Mississippi. They made their homes in and around New Orleans and the Mississippi River delta, establishing congregations like that of Tememe Derech and B'Nai Israel, with the mighty river serving as a mode of transportation and communication, connecting the communities on both sides of the riverbank.
Category: History

Carolina Israelite

Author : Kimberly Marlowe Hartnett
ISBN : 9781469621043
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 48.10 MB
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This first comprehensive biography of Jewish American writer and humorist Harry Golden (1903-1981)--author of the 1958 national best-seller Only in America--illuminates a remarkable life intertwined with the rise of the civil rights movement, Jewish popular culture, and the sometimes precarious position of Jews in the South and across America during the 1950s. After recounting Golden's childhood on New York's Lower East Side, Kimberly Marlowe Hartnett points to his stint in prison as a young man, after a widely publicized conviction for investment fraud during the Great Depression, as the root of his empathy for the underdog in any story. During World War II, the cigar-smoking, bourbon-loving raconteur landed in Charlotte, North Carolina, and founded the Carolina Israelite newspaper, which was published into the 1960s. Golden's writings on race relations and equal rights attracted a huge popular readership. Golden used his celebrity to editorialize for civil rights as the momentous story unfolded. He charmed his way into friendships and lively correspondence with Carl Sandburg, Adlai Stevenson, Robert Kennedy, and Billy Graham, among other notable Americans, and he appeared on the Tonight Show as well as other national television programs. Hartnett's spirited chronicle captures Golden's message of social inclusion for a new audience today.
Category: Biography & Autobiography