JEWISH DENVER

Download Jewish Denver ebook PDF or Read Online books in PDF, EPUB, and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to JEWISH DENVER book pdf for free now.

Jewish Denver

Author : Jeanne E. Abrams
ISBN : 0738548294
Genre : History
File Size : 21.16 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 371
Read : 290

In 1859, during the Pike's Peak gold rush, at least 12 Jews joined the great migration to Colorado in search of gold and a brighter future. The unpredictability of mining and a growing demand for supplies encouraged many of these Jewish settlers to establish small businesses in Denver and in towns and mining camps across the state. By the early 1870s, Jewish benevolent societies and a congregation were established. Denver's dry, mild climate attracted patients with tuberculosis, and two Jewish sanatoriums were opened in the city around the beginning of the 20th century. Many of the predominantly Eastern European Jews who came in search of better health made Denver their home, thus augmenting the early Jewish population significantly. Today Jewish life flourishes in Colorado, and Jewish citizens continue to play a vital role in its culture and development.
Category: History

A Bibliography Of Jewish Education In The United States

Author : Norman Drachler
ISBN : 9780814343494
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 82.12 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 963
Read : 1179

This book contains entries from thousands of publications whether in English, Hebrew, Yiddish, and German—books, research reports, educational and general periodicals, synagogue histories, conference proceedings, bibliographies, and encyclopedias—on all aspects of Jewish education from pre-school through secondary education
Category: Social Science

Jews Of The American West

Author : Moses Rischin
ISBN : 0814321712
Genre : History
File Size : 50.35 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 946
Read : 1323

In a series of nine original essays, the editors and other leading American historians bring dramatically new perspectives to bear on our understanding of the West, its Jews, and other Americans, both old and new. Whether comparing the history of the Jews of the West with the Jewish experience in the older regions of the country or bringing attention to the uniquely local aspects of the western experience, the contributors to this landmark volume perceive the West as an increasingly important and vital presence in the nation's history. The agrarians of Utah's Clarion and the cureseekers of Denver, no less than the boomers of Tucson, have been representative Americans, Jews, and westerners. Essays on the role of intermarriage, the shared encounter of immigrants and migrants, and the response to the founding of the State of Israel by western pioneer families, tell us much about the interaction of the West with our American world nation.
Category: History

Teaching Jewish Life Cycle

Author : Barbara Binder Kadden
ISBN : 0867050403
Genre : Religion
File Size : 31.46 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 525
Read : 329

Background information on every stage of life; covers every Jewish life cycle event from birth to death; insights from Jewish tradition; hundreds of creative activities for all ages.
Category: Religion

Jewish Women Pioneering The Frontier Trail

Author : Jeanne E. Abrams
ISBN : 9780814707203
Genre : Religion
File Size : 76.46 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 884
Read : 648

Western Jewish women's level of involvement at the vanguard of social welfare and progressive reform, commerce, politics, and higher education and the professions is striking given their relatively small numbers."--Jacket.
Category: Religion

Dr Charles David Spivak

Author : Jeanne Abrams
ISBN : 0870819739
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 33.29 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 393
Read : 170

Part biography, part medical history, and part study of Jewish life in turn-of-the-century America, Jeanne Abrams's book tells the story of Dr. Charles David Spivak - a Jewish immigrant from Russia who became one of the leaders of the American Tuberculosis Movement. Born in Russia in 1861, Spivak immigrated to the United States in 1882 and received his medical degree from Philadelphia's Jefferson Medical College by 1890. In 1896, his wife's poor health brought them to Colorado. Determined to find a cure, Spivak became one of the most charismatic and well-known leaders in the American Tuberculosis Movement. His role as director of Denver's Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society sanatorium allowed his personal philosophies to strongly influence policies. His unique blend of Yiddishkeit, socialism, and secularism - along with his belief in treating the "whole" patient - became a model for integrating medical, social, and rehabilitation services that was copied across the country. Not only a national leader in the crusade against tuberculosis but also a luminary in the American Jewish community, Dr. Charles Spivak was a physician, humanitarian, writer, linguist, journalist, administrator, social worker, ethnic broker, and medical, public health, and social crusader. Abrams's biography will be a welcome addition to anyone interested in the history of medicine, Jewish life in America, or Colorado history.
Category: Biography & Autobiography

Galveston

Author : Bernard Marinbach
ISBN : 9781438411903
Genre : History
File Size : 80.32 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 541
Read : 1055

While the massive flow of immigrants to the Northeast was taking place, a number of Jews were finding their way to America through the port of Galveston, Texas. The descendants of these immigrants, now scattered throughout the United States, are hardly aware that their ancestors participated in a unique attempt to organize and channel Jewish immigration. From their recruitment in Eastern Europe to their settlement in the American West, these immigrants were supervised by a network of agents and representatives. The project, known as the “Galveston Movement,” brought over ten thousand Jews to the United States between the years 1907 and 1914.
Category: History