IDENTIFYING AND INTERPRETING ANIMAL BONES A MANUAL TEXAS AM UNIVERSITY ANTHROPOLOGY SERIES

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Identifying And Interpreting Animal Bones

Author : April M. Beisaw
ISBN : 9781623490829
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 22.57 MB
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Offering a field-tested analytic method for identifying faunal remains, along with helpful references, images, and examples of the most commonly encountered North American species, Identifying and Interpreting Animal Bones: A Manual provides an important new reference for students, avocational archaeologists, and even naturalists and wildlife enthusiasts. Using the basic principles outlined here, the bones of any vertebrate animal, including humans, can be identified and their relevance to common research questions can be better understood. Because the interpretation of archaeological sites depends heavily on the analysis of surrounding materials—soils, artifacts, and floral and faunal remains—it is important that non-human remains be correctly distinguished from human bones, that distinctions between domesticated and wild or feral animals be made correctly, and that evidence of the reasons for faunal remains in the site be recognized. But the ability to identify and analyze animal bones is a skill that is not easy to learn from a traditional textbook. In Identifying and Interpreting Animal Bones, veteran archaeologist and educator April Beisaw guides readers through the stages of identification and analysis with sample images and data, also illustrating how specialists make analytical decisions that allow for the identification of the smallest fragments of bone. Extensive additional illustrative material, from the author’s own collected assemblages and from those in the Archaeological Analytical Research Facility at Binghamton University in New York, are also available in the book’s online supplement. There, readers can view and interact with images to further understanding of the principles explained in the text.
Category: Social Science

The Archaeology Of Animal Bones

Author : Terence Patrick O'Connor
ISBN : 1603440844
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 49.3 MB
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Animal ecologists can observe the present and reconstruct the last one or two centuries from historical sources, but the study of animal bones adds valuable insight into the peoples and landscapes of the past while telling much about the evolution of human-animal relationships. In this standard work, now available in paperback, O’Connor offers a detailed overview of the study of animal bones. He analyzes bone composition and structure and the archaeological evidence left by the processes of life, death, and decomposition. He goes on to look at how bone is excavated, examined, described, identified, measured, and reassembled into skeletons. The bulk of the book is devoted to the interpretation of bone fragments, which tell much about the animals themselves—their health, growth, diet, injuries, and age at death.
Category: Social Science

Animal Bones In Australian Archaeology

Author : Melanie Fillios
ISBN : 9781743324332
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 38.81 MB
Format : PDF
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Zooarchaeology has emerged as a powerful way of reconstructing the lives of past societies. Through the analysis of animal bones found on a site, zooarchaeologists can uncover important information on the economy, trade, industry, diet, and other fascinating facts about the people who lived there. Animal bones in Australian archaeology is an introductory bone identification manual written for archaeologists working in Australia. This field guide includes 16 species commonly encountered in both Indigenous and historical sites. Using diagrams and flow charts, it walks the reader step-by-step through the bone identification process. Combining practical and academic knowledge, the manual also provides an introductory insight into zooarchaeological methodology and the importance of zooarchaeological research in understanding human behaviour through time.
Category: Social Science

Mammal Bones And Teeth

Author : Simon Hillson
ISBN : 9781315424996
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 56.15 MB
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This guide is designed as an introduction to the basic methods for identifying mammal bones and teeth. It is intended to highlight for beginners the main points on which identifications can be made on the bulk of bones and teeth from a small range of common Old World mammals.
Category: Social Science

The Archaeology Of Institutional Life

Author : April M. Beisaw
ISBN : 9780817355166
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 37.37 MB
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Institutions pervade social life. They express community goals and values by defining the limits of socially acceptable behavior. Institutions are often vested with the resources, authority, and power to enforce the orthodoxy of their time. But institutions are also arenas in which both orthodoxies and authority can be contested. Between power and opposition lies the individual experience of the institutionalized. Whether in a boarding school, hospital, prison, almshouse, commune, or asylum, their experiences can reflect the positive impact of an institution or its greatest failings. This interplay of orthodoxy, authority, opposition, and individual experience are all expressed in the materiality of institutions and are eminently subject to archaeological investigation. A few archaeological and historical publications, in widely scattered venues, have examined individual institutional sites. Each work focused on the development of a specific establishment within its narrowly defined historical context; e.g., a fort and its role in a particular war, a schoolhouse viewed in terms of the educational history of its region, an asylum or prison seen as an expression of the prevailing attitudes toward the mentally ill and sociopaths. In contrast, this volume brings together twelve contributors whose research on a broad range of social institutions taken in tandem now illuminates the experience of these institutions. Rather than a culmination of research on institutions, it is a landmark work that will instigate vigorous and wide-ranging discussions on institutions in Western life, and the power of material culture to both enforce and negate cultural norms.
Category: Social Science

Quantitative Paleozoology

Author : R. Lee Lyman
ISBN : 9781139471121
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 26.45 MB
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Quantitative Paleozoology describes and illustrates how the remains of long-dead animals recovered from archaeological and paleontological excavations can be studied and analyzed. The methods range from determining how many animals of each species are represented to determining whether one collection consists of more broken and more burned bones than another. All methods are described and illustrated with data from real collections, while numerous graphs illustrate various quantitative properties.
Category: Social Science

Shells

Author : Cheryl Claassen
ISBN : 0521578523
Genre : Science
File Size : 50.75 MB
Format : PDF
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This book contains everything students and professional archaeologists could possibly want to know about the practicalities of shell analysis in archaeology, as well as the biology of freshwater and marine molluscs. The author also, however, discusses the potential of this class of evidence to tell us surprising things about seasonal patterns of life, the woods around a long-forgotten burial mound and the swirling patterns of life which circled around the humblest of creatures; the snail.
Category: Science

Race

Author : Ian Tattersall
ISBN : 1603444777
Genre : Science
File Size : 54.26 MB
Format : PDF
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Race has provided the rationale and excuse for some of the worst atrocities in human history. Yet, according to many biologists, physical anthropologists, and geneticists, there is no valid scientific justification for the concept of race. To be more precise, although there is clearly some physical basis for the variations that underlie perceptions of race, clear boundaries among “races” remain highly elusive from a purely biological standpoint. Differences among human populations that people intuitively view as “racial” are not only superficial but are also of astonishingly recent origin. In this intriguing and highly accessible book, physical anthropologist Ian Tattersall and geneticist Rob DeSalle, both senior scholars from the American Museum of Natural History, explain what human races actually are—and are not—and place them within the wider perspective of natural diversity. They explain that the relative isolation of local populations of the newly evolved human species during the last Ice Age—when Homo sapiens was spreading across the world from an African point of origin—has now begun to reverse itself, as differentiated human populations come back into contact and interbreed. Indeed, the authors suggest that all of the variety seen outside of Africa seems to have both accumulated and started reintegrating within only the last 50,000 or 60,000 years—the blink of an eye, from an evolutionary perspective. The overarching message of Race? Debunking a Scientific Myth is that scientifically speaking, there is nothing special about racial variation within the human species. These distinctions result from the working of entirely mundane evolutionary processes, such as those encountered in other organisms.
Category: Science

Stone Age Spear And Arrow Points Of The Midcontinental And Eastern United States

Author : Noel D. Justice
ISBN : 0253209854
Genre : History
File Size : 82.52 MB
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"This is an important new reference work for the professional archaeologist as well as the student and collector." —Central States Archaeological Journal "Justice... admirably synthesizes the scientific information integrating it with the popular approach. The result is a publication that readers on both sides of the spectrum should enjoy as well as comprehend." —Choice "... an indispensable guide to the literature. Attractive layout, design, and printing accent the useful text.... it should remain the standard reference on point typology of the midwest and eastern United States for many years to come." —Pennsylvania Archaeologist Archaeologists and amateur collectors alike will rejoice at this important reference work that surveys, describes, and categorizes the projectile points and cutting tools used in prehistory by the Indians in what are now the middle and eastern sections of the United States, from 12,000 B.C. to the beginning of the historic period. Mr. Justice describes over 120 separate types of stone arrowheads and spear points according to period, culture, and region. His detailed drawings show how Native Americans shaped their tools, what styles were peculiar to which regions, and how the various types can best be identified. There are over 485 drawings organized by type cluster and other identifying characteristics. The work also includes distribution maps and 111 examples in color.
Category: History