HITLERS FURIES GERMAN WOMEN IN THE NAZI KILLING FIELDS

Download Hitlers Furies German Women In The Nazi Killing Fields ebook PDF or Read Online books in PDF, EPUB, and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to HITLERS FURIES GERMAN WOMEN IN THE NAZI KILLING FIELDS book pdf for free now.

Hitler S Furies

Author : Wendy Lower
ISBN : 9780547863382
Genre : History
File Size : 38.25 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 991
Read : 1308

A history of German women in the Holocaust reveals their roles as plunderers, witnesses, and actual executioners on the Eastern front, describing how nurses, teachers, secretaries, and wives responded to what they believed to be Nazi opportunities only to perform brutal duties.
Category: History

Hitler S Furies

Author : Wendy Lower
ISBN : 9780547807416
Genre : History
File Size : 84.93 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 145
Read : 414

“Compelling . . . Lower brings to the forefront an unexplored aspect of the Holocaust.” —Washington Post In a surprising account that powerfully revises history, Wendy Lower uncovers the role of German women on the Nazi eastern front—not only as plunderers and direct witnesses, but as actual killers. Lower, drawing on twenty years of archival research and fieldwork, presents startling evidence that these women were more than “desk murderers” or comforters of murderous German men: they went on “shopping sprees” and romantic outings to the Jewish ghettos; they were present at killing-field picnics, not only providing refreshment but also shooting Jews. And Lower uncovers the stories of SS wives with children of their own whose brutality is as chilling as any in history. Hitler’s Furies challenges our deepest beliefs: women can be as brutal as men, and the evidence can be hidden for seventy years. “Disquieting . . . Earlier books about the Holocaust have offered up poster girls of brutality and atrocity . . . [Lower’s] insight is to track more mundane lives, and to argue for a vastly wider complicity.” —New York Times “An unsettling but significant contribution to our understanding of how nationalism, and specifically conceptions of loyalty, are normalized, reinforced, and regulated.” —Los Angeles Review of Books
Category: History

Hitler S Furies

Author : Wendy Lower
ISBN : 9781448113453
Genre : History
File Size : 44.31 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 162
Read : 569

Hitler’s Furies is the untold story of the Holocaust. History has it that the role of women in Nazi Germany was to be the perfect Hausfrau and a loyal cheerleader for the Führer. However, Lower’s research reveals an altogether more sinister truth. Lower shows us the ordinary women who became perpetrators of genocide. Drawing on decades of research, she uncovers a truth that has been in the shadows – that women too were brutal killers and that, in ignoring women’s culpability, we have ignored the reality of the Holocaust. ‘Shocking’ Sunday Times‘ Compelling’ Washington Post ‘Pioneering’ Literary Review A National Book Award Finalist
Category: History

What We Knew

Author : Eric A. Johnson
ISBN : 9780786722006
Genre : History
File Size : 36.27 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 978
Read : 1081

The horrors of the Nazi regime and the Holocaust still present some of the most disturbing questions in modern history: Why did Hitler's party appeal to millions of Germans, and how entrenched was anti-Semitism among the population? How could anyone claim, after the war, that the genocide of Europe's Jews was a secret? Did ordinary non-Jewish Germans live in fear of the Nazi state? In this unprecedented firsthand analysis of daily life as experienced in the Third Reich, What We Knew offers answers to these most important questions. Combining the expertise of Eric A. Johnson, an American historian, and Karl-Heinz Reuband, a German sociologist, What We Knew is the most startling oral history yet of everyday life in theThird Reich.
Category: History

Women In Nazi Society

Author : Jill Stephenson
ISBN : 9781136247408
Genre : History
File Size : 22.95 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 448
Read : 871

This fascinating book examines the position of women under the Nazis. The National Socialist movement was essentially male-dominated, with a fixed conception of the role women should play in society; while man was the warrior and breadwinner, woman was to be the homemaker and childbearer. The Nazi obsession with questions of race led to their insisting that women should be encouraged by every means to bear children for Germany, since Germany’s declining birth rate in the 1920s was in stark contrast with the prolific rates among the 'inferior' peoples of eastern Europe, who were seen by the Nazis as Germany’s foes. Thus, women were to be relieved of the need to enter paid employment after marriage, while higher education, which could lead to ambitions for a professional career, was to be closed to girls, or, at best, available to an exceptional few. All Nazi policies concerning women ultimately stemmed from the Party’s view that the German birth rate must be dramatically raised.
Category: History

Women And Nazis

Author : Wendy Adele-Marie Sarti
ISBN : IND:30000127740227
Genre : History
File Size : 41.44 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 462
Read : 869

A professor of history looks at the surprising number of women who were willing participants in genocide during the Holocaust.
Category: History

Frauen

Author : Alison Owings
ISBN : 0813522005
Genre : History
File Size : 37.48 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 516
Read : 390

Interviews with twenty-nine German women who lived during the Third Reich record their varied experiences--from shooting at Allied planes to hiding Jewish friends--and recall their doubt, guilt, enthusiasm, and fear.
Category: History

Between Dignity And Despair

Author : Marion A. Kaplan
ISBN : 0195313585
Genre : History
File Size : 89.51 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 510
Read : 753

Between Dignity and Despair draws on the extraordinary memoirs, diaries, interviews, and letters of Jewish women and men to give us the first intimate portrait of Jewish life in Nazi Germany. Kaplan tells the story of Jews in Germany not from the hindsight of the Holocaust, nor by focusing on the persecutors, but from the bewildered and ambiguous perspective of Jews trying to navigate their daily lives in a world that was becoming more and more insane. Answering the charge that Jews should have left earlier, Kaplan shows that far from seeming inevitable, the Holocaust was impossible to foresee precisely because Nazi repression occurred in irregular and unpredictable steps until the massive violence of Novemer 1938. Then the flow of emigration turned into a torrent, only to be stopped by the war. By that time Jews had been evicted from their homes, robbed of their possessions and their livelihoods, shunned by their former friends, persecuted by their neighbors, and driven into forced labor. For those trapped in Germany, mere survival became a nightmare of increasingly desperate options. Many took their own lives to retain at least some dignity in death; others went underground and endured the fears of nightly bombings and the even greater terror of being discovered by the Nazis. Most were murdered. All were pressed to the limit of human endurance and human loneliness. Focusing on the fate of families and particularly women's experience, Between Dignity and Despair takes us into the neighborhoods, into the kitchens, shops, and schools, to give us the shape and texture, the very feel of what it was like to be a Jew in Nazi Germany.
Category: History

Nazi Women

Author : Paul Roland
ISBN : 9781784280468
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 39.84 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 624
Read : 485

After the failure of the Weimar Republic, the Nazis believed their mission was to 'masculinize' life in Germany. Hermann Goering told women, "Take a pot, a dustpan and a broom, and marry a man", but many became active Nazis, helping to spread wide the net of evil.
Category: Political Science

Women And The Nazi East

Author : Elizabeth Harvey
ISBN : 030010040X
Genre : History
File Size : 87.24 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 683
Read : 277

This book examines the role of women in Nazi Germany's nationality struggle during the 1930s and in measures to Germanize occupied Poland during World War II. Drawing on previously untapped material from Polish and German archives, as well as memoirs and oral testimony from German women who were sent to wartime Poland, Elizabeth Harvey analyses the function of female activism within Nazi imperialism, its significance, and the extent to which women embraced policies intended to segregate Germans from non-Germans and to persecute Poles and Jews. the book emphasises the distinctive nature of female complicity in the system of racist domination. Harvey offers a new perspective on Nazi occupation policies, with vivid insights into regime practices at the grass roots and German civilian responses to the treatment of the Polish and Jewish population. In addition, she explores the complex ways in which Germans after 1945 remembered the Nazi East.
Category: History