Fort Center

Author : William Hulse Sears
ISBN : 0813012988
Genre : History
File Size : 34.16 MB
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"An excellent publication on an important southeastern site. . . . This book is a superb archaeological report."--Popular Archaeology "A landmark publication by one of the great American archaeologists, it should be read not only by southeastern specialists but by all concerned with agriculture and ceremonial life in the precolumbian New World."--Michael D. Coe, Curator, Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University Raising intriguing questions about the relationship of South Florida's prehistoric population to the Caribbean basin and about the origins of maize agriculture in the eastern United States, William Sears documents years of fieldwork at Fort Center, a site in the Lake Okeechobee Basin that was named for a nineteenth-century Seminole War fort. The Belle Glade people--by 500 B.C. the first inhabitants of the site--cultivated maize, draining their earliest fields with large circular ditches. Later fields resembled the raised linear earth mounds found at sites in Mesoamerica and northern South America. Excavations uncovered a charnel platform adorned with wood carvings of animals that was preserved in the mucky bottom of a pond, providing an unparalleled collection of prehistoric Indian art. Maps and photographs detailing these finds accompany the text. William H. Sears is professor emeritus in the Department of Anthropology at Florida Atlantic University, where he was Graduate Research Professor for many years.
Category: History

The Archaeology Of Traditions

Author : Timothy R. Pauketat
ISBN : 1616101296
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 62.99 MB
Format : PDF
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"At last, southeastern archaeology as history of people, not just 'cultures'."--Patricia Galloway, Mississippi Department of Archives and History Rich with the objects of the day-to-day lives of illiterate or common people in the southeastern United States, this book offers an archaeological reevaluation of history itself: where it is, what it is, and how it came to be. Through clothing, cooking, eating, tool making, and other mundane forms of social expression and production, traditions were altered daily in encounters between missionaries and natives, between planters and slaves, and between native leaders and native followers. As this work demonstrates, these "unwritten texts" proved to be potent ingredients in the larger-scale social and political events that shaped how peoples, cultures, and institutions came into being. These developments point to a common social process whereby men and women negotiated about their views of the world and--whether slaves, natives, or Europeans--created history. Bridging the pre-Columbian and colonial past, this book incorporates current theories that cut across disciplines to appeal to anthropologists, historians, and archaeologists. CONTENTS 1. A New Tradition in Archaeology, by Timothy R. Pauketat 2. African-American Tradition and Community in the Antebellum South, by Brian W. Thomas 3. Resistance and Accommodation in Apalachee Province, by John F. Scarry 4. Manipulating Bodies and Emerging Traditions at the Los Adaes Presidio, by Diana DiPaolo Loren 5. Negotiated Tradition? Native American Pottery in the Mission Period in La Florida, by Rebecca Saunders 6. Creek and Pre-Creek Revisited, by Cameron B. Wesson 7. Gender, Tradition, and the Negotiation of Power Relationships in Southern Appalachian Chiefdoms, by Lynne P. Sullivan and Christopher B. Rodning 8. Historical Science or Silence? Toward a Historical Anthropology of Mississippian Political Culture, by Mark A. Rees 9. Cahokian Change and the Authority of Tradition, by Susan M. Alt 10. The Historical-Processual Development of Late Woodland Societies, by Michael S. Nassaney 11. A Tradition of Discontinuity: American Bottom Early and Middle Woodland Culture History Reexamined, by Andrew C. Fortier 12. Interpreting Discontinuity and Historical Process in Midcontinental Late Archaic and Early Woodland Societies, by Thomas E. Emerson and Dale L. McElrath 13. Hunter-Gatherers and Traditions of Resistance, by Kenneth E. Sassaman 14. Traditions as Cultural Production: Implications for Contemporary Archaeological Research, by Kent G. Lightfoot 15. Concluding Thoughts on Tradition, History, and Archaeology, by Timothy R. Pauketat Timothy R. Pauketat, associate professor of anthropology at the University of Illinois, Urbana, is the author of The Ascent of Chiefs and coeditor of Cahokia: Domination and Ideology in the Mississippian World.
Category: Social Science

Communities In Contact

Author : Corinne Lisette Hofman
ISBN : 9789088900631
Genre : History
File Size : 89.99 MB
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"Communities in Contact represents the outcome of the Fourth International Leiden in the Caribbean symposium, entitled "From Prehistory to Ethnography in the circum-Caribbean." The contributions included in this volume cover a wide range of topics from avariety of disciplines - archaeology, bioarchaeology, ethnohistory and ethnography - revolving around the themes of mobility and exchange, culture contact, and settlement and community. The application of innovative approaches and the multi-dimensional character of these essays have provided exiting new perspectives on the indigenous communities of the circum-Caribbean and Amazonian regions throughout prehistory until the present."--pub. desc.
Category: History

Early Pottery

Author : Rebecca Saunders
ISBN : 9780817351274
Genre : Crafts & Hobbies
File Size : 31.42 MB
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A synthesis of research on earthenware technologies of the Late Archaic Period in the southeastern U.S. Information on social groups and boundaries, and on interaction between groups, burgeons when pottery appears on the social landscape of the Southeast in the Late Archaic period (ca. 5000-3000 years ago). This volume provides a broad, comparative review of current data from "first potteries" of the Atlantic and Gulf coastal plains and in the lower Mississippi River Valley, and it presents research that expands our understanding of how pottery functioned in its earliest manifestations in this region. Included are discussions of Orange pottery in peninsular Florida, Stallings pottery in Georgia, Elliot's Point fiber-tempered pottery in the Florida panhandle, and the various pottery types found in excavations over the years at the Poverty Point site in northeastern Louisiana. The data and discussions demonstrate that there was much more interaction, and at an earlier date, than is often credited to Late Archaic societies. Indeed, extensive trade in pottery throughout the region occurs as early as 1500 B.C. These and other findings make this book indispensable to those involved in research into the origin and development of pottery in general and its unique history in the Southeast in particular.
Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Time In Archaeology

Author : Simon Holdaway
ISBN : 9780874809299
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 55.48 MB
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A tightly focused group of papers on the deconstruction and significance of the concept of time, with a historical background on the development of time perspectivism and a range of case studies and examples. After reading this you may never think about time in quite the same way.
Category: Social Science

Tatham Mound

Author : Piers Anthony
ISBN : 0380713098
Genre : Fiction
File Size : 55.35 MB
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Sent by the spirits, Hotfoot, a native American prophet, travels among the various tribes of North America to deliver his people from the devastation that awaits them. Reprint.
Category: Fiction

Twelve Years A Slave Narrative Of Solomon Northup

Author : Solomon Northup
ISBN : 9788892657557
Genre : Fiction
File Size : 25.44 MB
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Solomon Northup was born a free man in New York State. At the age of 33 he was kidnapped in Washington D.C. and placed in an underground slave pen. Northup was transported by ship to New Orleans where he was sold into slavery. He spent the next 12 years working as a carpenter, driver, and cotton picker. This narrative reveals how Northup survived the harsh conditions of slavery, including smallpox, lashings, and an attempted hanging. Solomon Northup was among a select few who were freed from slavery. His account describes the daily life of slaves in Louisiana, their diet and living conditions, the relationship between master and slave, and how slave catchers used to recapture runaways. Northup's first person account published in 1853, was a dramatic story in the national debate over slavery that took place in the nine years leading up to the start of the American Civil War.
Category: Fiction

The Evolution Of Calusa

Author : Randolph J. Widmer
ISBN : 9780817303587
Genre : History
File Size : 85.6 MB
Format : PDF
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The Evolution of the Calusa attempts to explain how, why, and under what circumstances a complex chiefdom evolved on the southwest Florida coast, apparently without an agricultural subsistence base, and how far back in time it developed.
Category: History