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Crucible Of Pueblos

Author : Richard H. Wilshusen
ISBN : 1931745951
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 66.46 MB
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Archaeologists are increasingly recognizing the early Pueblo period as a major social and demographic transition in Southwest history. This book is the first comprehensive summary of population growth and migration, the materialization of early villages, cultural diversity, relations of social power, and the emergence of early great houses during the Pueblo period. It also explores the dynamics of social identity, power, and gender during this time of rapid change. With contributions by 25 of the leading archaeologists working in the Southwest, this important volume offers new insights about the origins of villages and examines how the study of the early Pueblo period contributes to an anthropological understanding of Southwest history and early farming societies throughout the world.--
Category: Social Science

The Oxford Handbook Of Southwest Archaeology

Author : Barbara Mills
ISBN : 9780199978427
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 37.86 MB
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The American Southwest is one of the most important archaeological regions in the world, with many of the best-studied examples of hunter-gatherer and village-based societies. Research has been carried out in the region for well over a century, and during this time the Southwest has repeatedly stood at the forefront of the development of new archaeological methods and theories. Moreover, research in the Southwest has long been a key site of collaboration between archaeologists, ethnographers, historians, linguists, biological anthropologists, and indigenous intellectuals. This volume marks the most ambitious effort to take stock of the empirical evidence, theoretical orientations, and historical reconstructions of the American Southwest. Over seventy top scholars have joined forces to produce an unparalleled survey of state of archaeological knowledge in the region. Themed chapters on particular methods and theories are accompanied by comprehensive overviews of the culture histories of particular archaeological sequences, from the initial Paleoindian occupation, to the rise of a major ritual center in Chaco Canyon, to the onset of the Spanish and American imperial projects. The result is an essential volume for any researcher working in the region as well as any archaeologist looking to take the pulse of contemporary trends in this key research tradition.
Category: Social Science

Chaco Revisited

Author : Carrie C. Heitman
ISBN : 9780816531608
Genre : History
File Size : 74.62 MB
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Bringing together both up-and-coming and well-known scholars of Chaco Canyon,Chaco Revisited provides readers with refreshing and updated analyses of research collected over the course of a century. Addressing age-old questions surrounding the canyon using new methods, contributors prove that Chaco Canyon was even more complex and fascinating than previously understood.
Category: History

Vernacular Architecture In The Pre Columbian Americas

Author : Christina Halperin
ISBN : 9781317238805
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 70.89 MB
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Vernacular Architecture in the Pre-Columbian Americas reveals the dynamism of the ancient past, where social relations and long-term history were created posthole by posthole, brick by brick. This collection shifts attention away from the elite and monumental architectural traditions of the region to instead investigate the creativity, subtlety and variability of common architecture and the people who built and dwelled in them. At the heart of this study of vernacular architecture is an emphasis on ordinary people and their built environments, and how these everyday spaces were pivotal in the making and meaning of social and cultural dynamics. Providing a deeper and more nuanced temporal perspective of common buildings in the Americas, the editors have deftly framed a study that highlights sociocultural diversity while at the same time facilitating broader comparative conversations around the theme of vernacular architecture. With diverse case studies covering a broad range of periods and regions, Vernacular Architecture in the Pre-Columbian Americas is an important addition to the growing body of scholarship on the indigenous architecture of the Americas and is a key contribution to our archaeological understandings of past built environments.
Category: Social Science

Living And Leaving

Author : Donna M. Glowacki
ISBN : 9780816502486
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 83.46 MB
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The Mesa Verde migrations in the thirteenth century were an integral part of a transformative period that forever changed the course of Pueblo history. For more than seven hundred years, Pueblo people lived in the Northern San Juan region of the U.S. Southwest. Yet by the end of the 1200s, tens of thousands of Pueblo people had left the region. Understanding how it happened and where they went are enduring questions central to Southwestern archaeology. Much of the focus on this topic has been directed at understanding the role of climate change, drought, violence, and population pressure. The role of social factors, particularly religious change and sociopolitical organization, are less well understood. Bringing together multiple lines of evidence, including settlement patterns, pottery exchange networks, and changes in ceremonial and civic architecture, this book takes a historical perspective that naturally forefronts the social factors underlying the depopulation of Mesa Verde. Author Donna M. Glowacki shows how “living and leaving” were experienced across the region and what role differing stressors and enablers had in causing emigration. The author’s analysis explains how different histories and contingencies—which were shaped by deeply rooted eastern and western identities, a broad-reaching Aztec-Chaco ideology, and the McElmo Intensification—converged, prompting everyone to leave the region. This book will be of interest to southwestern specialists and anyone interested in societal collapse, transformation, and resilience.
Category: Social Science

Constructing Community

Author : Alison E. Rautman
ISBN : 9780816530694
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 45.47 MB
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In Constructing Community, Alison E. Rautman uses the Salinas District in New Mexico to examine the relationships of subsistence practices, mobility, and settlement. Rautman tackles a very broad topic: how archaeologists use material evidence to infer and imagine how people lived in the past, how they coped with everyday decisions and tensions, and how they created a sense of themselves and their place in the world.
Category: Social Science

Footprints Of Hopi History

Author : Leigh J. Kuwanwisiwma
ISBN : 9780816536986
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 66.76 MB
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This book demonstrates how one tribe has significantly advanced knowledge about its past through collaboration with anthropologists and historians--Provided by publisher.
Category: Social Science

Southwestern Pithouse Communities Ad 200 900

Author : Lisa C. Young
ISBN : 0816529736
Genre : History
File Size : 90.50 MB
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Pithouses are the earliest identifiable domestic architecture in many areas of the world, and can provide insights into the origins of communities--a fundamental component of past and present societies. In this book, Lisa Young and Sarah Herr invite archaeologists to explore the development of communities using information from pithouse sites in the American Southwest. Using regional and topical syntheses to investigate the formation of pithouse communities, contributors to this volume examine the complex relationship between the economic transition to agricultural dependence and the social changes associated with sedentism. They discover that during this transformation, peoples' relationship with the landscape changed in ways that affected their use of space, community organization, and cultural identity. Employing various theoretical perspectives, these contributions analyze changes in pithouses, site layout, communal architecture, and settlement patterns to investigate the development of place-based communities. Chapters look at community formation strategies in populous regions like the northern San Juan Basin, the southern Colorado Plateau, Mimbres/southern Mogollon, and Hohokam Basin and Range and compare them with social structures in more sparsely populated regions like the northeast Hohokam peripheries, the Arizona Transition Zone, the Cibola region, southeast New Mexico, and the northern Rio Grande. The book also includes thematic discussions of panregional economic change, the complex relationship between house and household, and the demographic shifts accompanying the Neolithic Demographic Transition. An essential book for students and archaeologists interested in the origins of communities, Southwestern Pithouse Communities is also an important comparative resource for scholars interested in social change during the transition to settled village life.
Category: History

A Pueblo Social History

Author : John A. Ware
ISBN : 1938645103
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 20.12 MB
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"A Pueblo Social History explores the intersection of archaeology, ethnohistory, and ethnology. Ware argues that all of the key Pueblo social, ceremonial, and political institutions--and their relative importance across the Pueblo world--can only be explained in terms of indigenous social history stretching back nearly two millennia. He shows that the principal community organizations of the Pueblos emerged for the first time nearly thirteen hundred years ago, and that the interaction of these organizations would forge most of the unique social practices and institutions described in the historical Pueblo ethnographies." -- Publisher's website.
Category: Social Science

Understanding Collapse

Author : Guy D. Middleton
ISBN : 9781107151499
Genre : History
File Size : 54.9 MB
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In this lively survey, Guy D. Middleton critically examines our ideas about collapse - how we explain it and how we have constructed potentially misleading myths around collapses - showing how and why collapse of societies was a much more complex phenomenon than is often admitted.
Category: History