Contemporary Druidry A Historical And Ethnographic Study

Author : Michael T. Cooper
ISBN : 9781452471327
Genre : Religion
File Size : 26.65 MB
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Contemporary Druidry is one of the fastest growing religions in Western society. This book addresses the attempt by practitioners to bring an ancient spirituality into the mainstream. It examines ancient Druid beliefs and critiques the contemporary expression by comparing the two. Relying on eight years of research and more than 200 interviews, the book provides an outsider's look at this faith
Category: Religion

Archaeologists And The Dead

Author : Howard Williams
ISBN : 9780198753537
Genre :
File Size : 61.84 MB
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This volume addresses the relationship between archaeologists and the dead, through the many dimensions of their relationships: in the field (through practical and legal issues), in the lab (through their analysis and interpretation), and in their written, visual and exhibitionary practice--disseminated to a variety of academic and public audiences. Written from a variety of perspectives, its authors address the experience, effect, ethical considerations, and cultural politics of working with mortuary archaeology. Whilst some papers reflect institutional or organizational approaches, others are more personal in their view: creating exciting and frank insights into contemporary issues that have hitherto often remained "unspoken" among the discipline. Reframing funerary archaeologists as "death-workers" of a kind, the contributors reflect on their own experience to provide both guidance and inspiration to future practitioners, arguing strongly that we have a central role to play in engaging the public with themes of mortality and commemoration, through the lens of the past. Spurred by the recent debates in the UK, papers from Scandinavia, Austria, Italy, the US, and the mid-Atlantic, frame these issues within a much wider international context that highlights the importance of cultural and historical context in which this work takes place.
Category:

Experiencing Religion

Author : Clara Saraiva
ISBN : 9783643907271
Genre :
File Size : 75.48 MB
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The various ethnologists and anthropologists contributing to this volume focus on the "self"-perspective in relation to religion and spirituality: on how religiosity is personally thought, dreamt, imagined, created, felt, perceived and experienced, in its various subjective forms. The personal motive and practice in religion is here put to the front. One can see this perspective also reflected in today's society, in the ways people, most strongly in the West, are nowadays dealing with religion, religiosity or spirituality, often drifted far away from the institutional church organizations. As a deeply personal experience, it is amazing how little effort is undertaken in a scholarly way to put the personal reflections, utterings and experiences into words. A wide variety of personal religious or spiritual experiences, Christian and non-Christian, recent and historical, are now described and analysed in this fascinating volume. Clara Saraiva is a senior researcher at the Lisbon Institute for Scientific Tropical Research in Lisbon, a researcher of the Center for Research in Anthropology (cria) and a Professor at the Department of Anthropology, Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, Universidade Nova de Lisboa. Peter Jan Margry is Professor for European ethnology at the University of Amsterdam and Senior Research Fellow at Meertens Institute, KNAW , Amsterdam. Lionel Obadia is professor in anthropology at the University of Lyon. Kinga Povedak is assistant research fellow at the has Research Group on Religious Culture,at Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Jose Mapril is lecturer in Anthropology at the New University of Lisbon and a research fellow at CRIA - New University of Lisbon (Centre for Anthropological Research).
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Religion As A Category Of Governance And Sovereignty

Author :
ISBN : 9789004290594
Genre : Religion
File Size : 25.28 MB
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Religious-secular distinctions have been crucial to the way in which modern governments have rationalised their governance and marked out their sovereignty – as crucial as the territorial boundaries that they have drawn around nations. The authors of this volume provide a multi-dimensional picture of how the category of religion has served the ends of modern government.
Category: Religion

The Archaeology Of Shamanism

Author : Neil Price
ISBN : 9781134527700
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 31.71 MB
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In this timely collection, Neil Price provides a general introduction to the archaeology of shamanism by bringing together recent archaeological thought on the subject. Blending theoretical discussion with detailed case studies, the issues addressed include shamanic material culture, responses to dying and the dead, shamanic soundscapes, the use of ritual architecture and shamanism in the context of other belief systems such as totemism. Following an intial orientation reviewing shamanism as an anthropological construct, the volume focuses on the Northern hemisphere with case studies from Greenland to Nepal, Siberia to Kazakhstan. The papers span a chronological range from Upper Palaeolithic to the present and explore such cross-cutting themes as gender and the body, identity, landscape, architecture, as well as shamanic interpretations of rock art and shamanism in the heritage and cultural identity of indigenous peoples. The volume also addresses the interpretation of shamanic beliefs in terms of cognitive neuroscience and the modern public perception of prehistoric shamanism.
Category: Social Science

Blood And Mistletoe

Author : Ronald Hutton
ISBN : 9780300144857
Genre : History
File Size : 48.95 MB
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Crushed by the Romans in the first century A.D., the ancient Druids of Britain left almost no reliable evidence behind. Because of this, historian Ronald Hutton shows, succeeding British generations have been free to reimagine, reinterpret, and reinvent the Druids. Hutton’s captivating book is the first to encompass two thousand years of Druid history and to explore the evolution of English, Scottish, and Welsh attitudes toward the forever ambiguous figures of the ancient Celtic world. Druids have been remembered at different times as patriots, scientists, philosophers, or priests; sometimes portrayed as corrupt, bloodthirsty, or ignorant, they were also seen as fomenters of rebellion. Hutton charts how the Druids have been written in and out of history, archaeology, and the public consciousness for some 500 years, with particular focus on the romantic period, when Druids completely dominated notions of British prehistory. Sparkling with legends and images, filled with new perspectives on ancient and modern times, this book is a fascinating cultural study of Druids as catalysts in British history.
Category: History

Christianities In The Early Modern Celtic World

Author : T. O' Hannrachain
ISBN : 9781137306357
Genre : History
File Size : 58.80 MB
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Ranging from devotional poetry to confessional history, across the span of competing religious traditions, this volume addresses the lived faith of diverse communities during the turmoil of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Together, they provide a textured understanding of the complexities in religious belief, practice and organization.
Category: History

Paganistan

Author : Dr Murphy Pizza
ISBN : 9781472400543
Genre : Body, Mind & Spirit
File Size : 52.4 MB
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Paganistan - a moniker adapted by the Twin Cities Contemporary Pagan community - is the title of a history and ethnography of a regionally unique, urban, and vibrant community in Minnesota. The story of the community traces the formation of some of the earliest organizations and churches in the US, the influence of publication houses and bookstores, the marketplace, and the local University, on the growth and sustenance of a distinct Pagan community identity, as well as discussions of the patterns of diversifying and cohesion that occur as a result of societal pressure, politics, and generational growth within it. As the first ever study of this long-lived community, this book sets out to document Paganistan as another aspect of the increasing prevalence of Paganism in the US and contributes to the discussion of the formation of new American religious communities. Revealing how canonical theories about community formation in anthropology do not always fit comfortably nor accurately describe how a vibrant Pagan community creates and sustains itself, this book will be of interest to scholars of religion and new religious movements worldwide, and offers a valuable contribution to discussions within both urban anthropology and sociology.
Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

New Age And Neopagan Religions In America

Author : Sarah M. Pike
ISBN : 9780231508384
Genre : Religion
File Size : 45.96 MB
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From Shirley MacLaine’s spiritual biography Out on a Limb to the teenage witches in the film The Craft, New Age and Neopagan beliefs have made sensationalistic headlines. In the mid- to late 1990s, several important scholarly studies of the New Age and Neopagan movements were published, attesting to academic as well as popular recognition that these religions are a significant presence on the contemporary North American religious landscape. Self-help books by New Age channelers and psychics are a large and growing market; annual spending on channeling, self-help businesses, and alternative health care is at $10 to $14 billion; an estimated 12 million Americans are involved with New Age activities; and American Neopagans are estimated at around 200,000. New Age and Neopagan Religions in America introduces the beliefs and practices behind the public faces of these controversial movements, which have been growing steadily in late twentieth- and early twenty-first-century America. What is the New Age movement, and how is it different from and similar to Neopaganism in its underlying beliefs and still-evolving practices? Where did these decentralized and eclectic movements come from, and why have they grown and flourished at this point in American religious history? What is the relationship between the New Age and Neopaganism and other religions in America, particularly Christianity, which is often construed as antagonistic to them? Drawing on historical and ethnographic accounts, Sarah Pike explores these questions and offers a sympathetic yet critical treatment of religious practices often marginalized yet soaring in popularity. The book provides a general introduction to the varieties of New Age and Neopagan religions in the United States today as well as an account of their nineteenth-century roots and emergence from the 1960s counterculture. Covering such topics as healing, gender and sexuality, millennialism, and ritual experience, it also furnishes a rich description and analysis of the spiritual worlds and social networks created by participants.
Category: Religion