CLOSING THE GATE RACE POLITICS AND THE CHINESE EXCLUSION ACT CONTENTION 7

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Closing The Gate

Author : Andrew Gyory
ISBN : 9780807866757
Genre : History
File Size : 42.93 MB
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The Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, which barred practically all Chinese from American shores for ten years, was the first federal law that banned a group of immigrants solely on the basis of race or nationality. By changing America's traditional policy of open immigration, this landmark legislation set a precedent for future restrictions against Asian immigrants in the early 1900s and against Europeans in the 1920s. Tracing the origins of the Chinese Exclusion Act, Andrew Gyory presents a bold new interpretation of American politics during Reconstruction and the Gilded Age. Rather than directly confront such divisive problems as class conflict, economic depression, and rising unemployment, he contends, politicians sought a safe, nonideological solution to the nation's industrial crisis--and latched onto Chinese exclusion. Ignoring workers' demands for an end simply to imported contract labor, they claimed instead that working people would be better off if there were no Chinese immigrants. By playing the race card, Gyory argues, national politicians--not California, not organized labor, and not a general racist atmosphere--provided the motive force behind the era's most racist legislation.
Category: History

At America S Gates

Author : Erika Lee
ISBN : 0807863130
Genre : Law
File Size : 42.89 MB
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With the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, Chinese laborers became the first group in American history to be excluded from the United States on the basis of their race and class. This landmark law changed the course of U.S. immigration history, but we know little about its consequences for the Chinese in America or for the United States as a nation of immigrants. At America's Gates is the first book devoted entirely to both Chinese immigrants and the American immigration officials who sought to keep them out. Erika Lee explores how Chinese exclusion laws not only transformed Chinese American lives, immigration patterns, identities, and families but also recast the United States into a "gatekeeping nation." Immigrant identification, border enforcement, surveillance, and deportation policies were extended far beyond any controls that had existed in the United States before. Drawing on a rich trove of historical sources--including recently released immigration records, oral histories, interviews, and letters--Lee brings alive the forgotten journeys, secrets, hardships, and triumphs of Chinese immigrants. Her timely book exposes the legacy of Chinese exclusion in current American immigration control and race relations.
Category: Law

The Chinese Exclusion Act Of 1882

Author : John Robert Soennichsen
ISBN : 9780313379468
Genre : History
File Size : 76.59 MB
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Chronicles the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, which restricted Chinese immigration to the United States, including the conditions in China that led to the migration, the prejudices and acts of violence against the group, and the repeal of 1943.
Category: History

Entry Denied

Author : Sucheng Chan
ISBN : 1566392012
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 23.90 MB
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In 1882, Congress passed a Chinese exclusion law that barred the entry of Chinese laborers for ten years. The Chinese thus became the first people to be restricted from immigrating into the United States on the basis of race. Exclusion was renewed in 1892 and 1902 and finally made permanent in 1904. Only in 1943 did Congress rescind all the Chinese exclusion laws as a gesture of goodwill towards China, an ally of the United States during World War II. Entry Denied is a collection of essays on how the Chinese exclusion laws were implemented and how the Chinese as individuals and as a community in the U.S. mobilized to mitigate the restrictions imposed upon them. It is the first book in English to rely on Chinese language sources to explore the exclusion era in Chinese American history. Author note: Sucheng Chan, Professor and Chair of Asian American Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara, is general editor of Temple's Asian American History and Culture Series.
Category: Social Science

Forbidden Workers

Author : Peter Kwong
ISBN : 156584355X
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 54.32 MB
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Tells the story of Chinese immigrants to the United States, discussing how these individuals illegally enter the country and the poor working conditions they face in their new home
Category: Business & Economics

Impossible Subjects

Author : Mae M. Ngai
ISBN : 9781400850235
Genre : History
File Size : 87.21 MB
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This book traces the origins of the "illegal alien" in American law and society, explaining why and how illegal migration became the central problem in U.S. immigration policy—a process that profoundly shaped ideas and practices about citizenship, race, and state authority in the twentieth century. Mae Ngai offers a close reading of the legal regime of restriction that commenced in the 1920s—its statutory architecture, judicial genealogies, administrative enforcement, differential treatment of European and non-European migrants, and long-term effects. She shows that immigration restriction, particularly national-origin and numerical quotas, remapped America both by creating new categories of racial difference and by emphasizing as never before the nation's contiguous land borders and their patrol. Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.
Category: History

The Road To Chinese Exclusion

Author : Liping Zhu
ISBN : 0700619194
Genre : History
File Size : 57.87 MB
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This first detailed account of the Denver Anti-Chinese Riot of 1880 tells the complex story of how anti-Chinese nativism in the nineteenth century grew from a regional political issue to a full-fledged national concern. Provides a new way of understanding late nineteenth-century race relations, as well as American sectionalism.
Category: History

Immigration And The Legalization Of Racism

Author : Lisa Marie Jakubowski
ISBN : STANFORD:36105021142315
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 39.63 MB
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Presenting a Left at odds with the Aboriginal struggle to preserve traditional society, land, and culture, this book proposes that the preservation of Aboriginal traditional life can have progressive and even revolutionary consequences.
Category: Social Science

No There There

Author : Chris Rhomberg
ISBN : 9780520940888
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 21.45 MB
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Challenged by Ku Klux Klan action in the '20s, labor protests culminating in a general strike in the '40s, and the rise of the civil rights and black power struggles of the '60s, Oakland, California, seems to encapsulate in one city the broad and varied sweep of urban social movements in twentieth-century America. Taking Oakland as a case study of urban politics and society in the United States, Chris Rhomberg examines the city's successive episodes of popular insurgency for what they can tell us about critical discontinuities in the American experience of urban political community.
Category: Social Science

Why Nations Fail

Author : Daron Acemoglu
ISBN : 9781847654618
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 46.90 MB
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Shortlisted for the Financial Times and Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award 2012. Why are some nations more prosperous than others? Why Nations Fail sets out to answer this question, with a compelling and elegantly argued new theory: that it is not down to climate, geography or culture, but because of institutions. Drawing on an extraordinary range of contemporary and historical examples, from ancient Rome through the Tudors to modern-day China, leading academics Daron Acemoglu and James A. Robinson show that to invest and prosper, people need to know that if they work hard, they can make money and actually keep it - and this means sound institutions that allow virtuous circles of innovation, expansion and peace. Based on fifteen years of research, and answering the competing arguments of authors ranging from Max Weber to Jeffrey Sachs and Jared Diamond, Acemoglu and Robinson step boldly into the territory of Francis Fukuyama and Ian Morris. They blend economics, politics, history and current affairs to provide a new, powerful and persuasive way of understanding wealth and poverty.
Category: Business & Economics