CLASH HOW TO THRIVE IN A MULTICULTURAL WORLD

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Clash

Author : Hazel Rose Markus
ISBN : 9780142180938
Genre : Psychology
File Size : 86.8 MB
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Demonstrates how an individual's cultural background creates and reflects independent and interdependent qualities, explaining how disparities between each shape everything from business and government management to education and parenting.
Category: Psychology

Clash

Author : Hazel Rose Markus
ISBN : 9781101623602
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 24.11 MB
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“If you fear that cultural, political, and class differences are tearing America apart, read this important book.” —Jonathan Haidt, Ph.D., author of The Righteous Mind Who will rule in the twenty-first century: allegedly more disciplined Asians, or allegedly more creative Westerners? Can women rocket up the corporate ladder without knocking off the men? How can poor kids get ahead when schools favor the rich? As our planet gets smaller, cultural conflicts are becoming fiercer. Rather than lamenting our multicultural worlds, Hazel Rose Markus and Alana Conner reveal how we can leverage our differences to mend the rifts in our workplaces, schools, and relationships, as well as on the global stage. Provocative, witty, and painstakingly researched, Clash! not only explains who we are, it also envisions who we could become. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Category: Social Science

Clash

Author : Hazel Rose Markus
ISBN : 1594630984
Genre : Psychology
File Size : 73.87 MB
Format : PDF
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Two forefront cultural psychologists demonstrate how an individual's cultural background creates and reflects independent and interdependent qualities, explaining how disparities between independence and interdependence shape everything from business and government management to education and parenting.
Category: Psychology

Facing Social Class

Author : Susan T. Fiske
ISBN : 9781610447812
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 36.82 MB
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Many Americans, holding fast to the American Dream and the promise of equal opportunity, claim that social class doesn't matter. Yet the ways we talk and dress, our interactions with authority figures, the degree of trust we place in strangers, our religious beliefs, our achievements, our senses of morality and of ourselves—all are marked by social class, a powerful factor affecting every domain of life. In Facing Social Class, social psychologists Susan Fiske and Hazel Rose Markus, and a team of sociologists, anthropologists, linguists, and legal scholars, examine the many ways we communicate our class position to others and how social class shapes our daily, face-to-face interactions—from casual exchanges to interactions at school, work, and home. Facing Social Class exposes the contradiction between the American ideal of equal opportunity and the harsh reality of growing inequality, and it shows how this tension is reflected in cultural ideas and values, institutional practices, everyday social interactions, and psychological tendencies. Contributor Joan Williams examines cultural differences between middle- and working-class people and shows how the cultural gap between social class groups can influence everything from voting practices and political beliefs to work habits, home life, and social behaviors. In a similar vein, Annette Lareau and Jessica McCrory Calarco analyze the cultural advantages or disadvantages exhibited by different classes in institutional settings, such as those between parents and teachers. They find that middle-class parents are better able to advocate effectively for their children in school than are working-class parents, who are less likely to challenge a teacher's authority. Michael Kraus, Michelle Rheinschmidt, and Paul Piff explore the subtle ways we signal class status in social situations. Conversational style and how close one person stands to another, for example, can influence the balance of power in a business interaction. Diana Sanchez and Julie Garcia even demonstrate that markers of low socioeconomic status such as incarceration or unemployment can influence whether individuals are categorized as white or black—a finding that underscores how race and class may work in tandem to shape advantage or disadvantage in social interactions. The United States has one of the highest levels of income inequality and one of the lowest levels of social mobility among industrialized nations, yet many Americans continue to buy into the myth that theirs is a classless society. Facing Social Class faces the reality of how social class operates in our daily lives, why it is so pervasive, and what can be done to alleviate its effects.
Category: Social Science

Wired For Culture Origins Of The Human Social Mind

Author : Mark Pagel
ISBN : 9780393065879
Genre : Science
File Size : 32.4 MB
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An evolutionary biologist explores the concept of culture and how it influenced our collective human behaviors from the beginning of evolution through modern times and offers new insights on how art, morality and altruism and self-interest define being human. 20,000 first printing.
Category: Science

Exploring Culture

Author : Gert Jan Hofstede
ISBN : 9780585485904
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 58.98 MB
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Provides more than seventy-five activities, dialogues and stories. An outstanding resource for trainers and educators.
Category: Business & Economics

Clash Or Complement Of Cultures

Author : Hector E. Garcia
ISBN : 9780761868316
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 37.9 MB
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Book proposes that revolutionary changes caused by globalization require an equivalent paradigm. Interdependence inherent to globalization will not function if winning-is-the-only-thing mindset continues to prevail in U.S. and the West. Book describes a paradigm shift, which explains why balance between cooperation and competition is logical and how to effect it.
Category: Political Science

The Autobiographical Self In Time And Culture

Author : Qi Wang
ISBN : 9780199322640
Genre : Psychology
File Size : 73.54 MB
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In this volume, Qi Wang traces the developmental, social, cultural, and historical origins of the autobiographical self - the self that is made of memories of the personal past and of the family and the community. Wang combines rigorous research, sensitive survey of real memories and memory conversations, and fascinating personal anecdotes into a state-of-the-art book. As a "marginal woman" who grew up in the East and works and lives in the West, Wang's analysis is unique, insightful, and approachable. Her accounts of her own family stories, extraordinarily careful and thorough documentation of research findings, and compelling theoretical insights together convey an unequivocal message: The autobiographical self is conditioned by one's time and culture. Beginning with a perceptive examination of the form, content, and function of parent-child conversations of personal and family stories, Wang undertakes to show how the autobiographical self is formed in and shaped by the process of family storytelling situated in specific cultural contexts. By contrasting the development of autobiographical writings in Western and Chinese literatures, Wang seeks to demonstrate the cultural stance of the autobiographical self in historical time. She examines the autobiographical self in personal time, thoughtfully analyzing the form, structure, and content of everyday memories to reveal the role of culture in modulating information processing and determining how the autobiographical self is remembered. Focusing on memories of early childhood, Wang seeks to answer the question of when the autobiographical self begins from a cross-cultural perspective. She sets out further to explore some of the most controversial issues in current psychological research of autobiographical memory, focusing particularly on issues of memory representations versus memory narratives and silence versus voice in the construction of the autobiographical self appropriate to one's cultural assumptions. She concludes with historical analyses of the influences of the larger social, political, and economic forces on the autobiographical self, and takes a forward look at the autobiographical self as a product of modern technology.
Category: Psychology

Stfu Parents

Author : Blair Koenig
ISBN : 9781101622124
Genre : Humor
File Size : 38.3 MB
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Are you a parent? Do you have friends who are parents? Do you have parents? Then chances are you’ve been exposed to the growing online phenomenon known as overshare. From posting photos of baby’s first poo and the intricacies of placental crafts to sanctimommies declaring their child the most beautiful kid in the world and criticizing the parenting skills of fellow Facebook “friends,” STFU, Parents collects the most bizarre, hilarious, and horrifying examples of oversharing on the web. You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, you’ll cringe at detailed descriptions of baby’s first blowout, but one thing’s for sure: You’ll never look at parenting the same again.
Category: Humor

The Culture Map Intl Ed

Author : Erin Meyer
ISBN : 9781610396714
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 79.36 MB
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Whether you work in a home office or abroad, business success in our ever more globalized and virtual world requires the skills to navigate through cultural differences and decode cultures foreign to your own. Renowned expert Erin Meyer is your guide through this subtle, sometimes treacherous terrain where people from starkly different backgrounds are expected to work harmoniously together. When you have Americans who precede anything negative with three nice comments; French, Dutch, Israelis, and Germans who get straight to the point (“your presentation was simply awful”); Latin Americans and Asians who are steeped in hierarchy; Scandinavians who think the best boss is just one of the crowd—the result can be, well, sometimes interesting, even funny, but often disastrous. Even with English as a global language, it's easy to fall into cultural traps that endanger careers and sink deals when, say, a Brazilian manager tries to fathom how his Chinese suppliers really get things done, or an American team leader tries to get a handle on the intra-team dynamics between his Russian and Indian team members. In The Culture Map, Erin Meyer provides a field-tested model for decoding how cultural differences impact international business. She combines a smart analytical framework with practical, actionable advice for succeeding in a global world.
Category: Business & Economics