CITIZEN 13660

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Citizen 13660

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ISBN : 0295959894
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 72.4 MB
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Drawings with brief comments by the author describe her memories of life in a California internment camp during World War II
Category: Biography & Autobiography

Citizen 13660

Author :
ISBN : 0295993928
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 42.79 MB
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Mine Okubo was one of over one hundred thousand people of Japanese descent--nearly two-thirds of whom were American citizens--who were forced into "protective custody" shortly after Pearl Harbor. Citizen 13660, Okubo's graphic memoir of life in relocation centers in California and Utah, illuminates this experience with poignant illustrations and witty, candid text. Now available with a new introduction by Christine Hong and in a wide-format artist edition, this graphic novel can reach a new generation of readers and scholars. "[Mine Okubo] took her months of life in the concentration camp and made it the material for this amusing, heart-breaking book. . . . The moral is never expressed, but the wry pictures and the scanty words make the reader laugh--and if he is an American too--blush." "A remarkably objective and vivid and even humorous account. . . . In dramatic and detailed drawings and brief text, she documents the whole episode . . . all that she saw, objectively, yet with a warmth of understanding." -New York Times Book Review
Category: Biography & Autobiography

Citizen 13660

Author :
ISBN : OCLC:187407579
Genre : Concentration camps
File Size : 21.48 MB
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Category: Concentration camps

Mine Okubo

Author : Greg Robinson
ISBN : 9780295997629
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 43.12 MB
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�To me life and art are one and the same, for the key lies in one's knowledge of people and life. In art one is trying to express it in the simplest imaginative way, as in the art of past civilizations, for beauty and truth are the only two things which live timeless and ageless.� - Min� Okubo This is the first book-length critical examination of the life and work of Min� Okubo (1912-2001), a pioneering Nisei artist, writer, and social activist who repeatedly defied conventional role expectations for women and for Japanese Americans over her seventy-year career. Okubo's landmark Citizen 13660 (first published in 1946) is the first and arguably best-known autobiographical narrative of the wartime Japanese American relocation and confinement experience. Born in Riverside, California, Okubo was incarcerated by the U.S. government during World War II, first at the Tanforan Assembly Center in California and later at the Topaz War Relocation Center in Utah. There she taught art and directed the production of a literary and art magazine. While in camp, Okubo documented her confinement experience by making hundreds of paintings and pen-and-ink sketches. These provided the material for Citizen 13660. Word of her talent spread to Fortune magazine, which hired her as an illustrator. Under the magazine's auspices, she was able to leave the camp and relocate to New York City, where she pursued her art over the next half century. This lovely and inviting book, lavishly illustrated with both color and halftone images, many of which have never before been reproduced, introduces readers to Okubo's oeuvre through a selection of her paintings, drawings, illustrations, and writings from different periods of her life. In addition, it contains tributes and essays on Okubo's career and legacy by specialists in the fields of art history, education, women's studies, literature, American political history, and ethnic studies, essays that illuminate the importance of her contributions to American arts and letters. Min� Okubo expands the sparse critical literature on Asian American women, as well as that on the Asian American experience in the eastern United States. It also serves as an excellent companion to Citizen 13660, providing critical tools and background to place Okubo's work in its historical and literary contexts.
Category: Social Science

After Camp

Author : Greg Robinson
ISBN : 9780520271586
Genre : History
File Size : 54.41 MB
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"The tragedy of incarceration has dominated historical studies of Japanese Americans, and few have explored what happened in the years that followed. A welcome addition to the literature, Greg Robinson's insightful study, "After Camp," will appeal to historians of immigration, the Asian American experience, comparative race relations, and the twentieth-century United States more broadly." --David K. Yoo, author of "Growing Up Nisei" "Greg Robinson has boldly and rightfully identified historians' neglect of Japanese American experiences after World War II. Rather than focusing exclusively on the Pacific Coast, "After Camp" offers a nuanced exploration of the competing strategies and ideas about postwar assimilation among ethnic Japanese on a truly national scale. The depth and range of Robinson's research is impressive, and "After Camp" convincingly moves beyond the tragedy of internment to explain how the drama of resettlement was equally if not more important in shaping the lives of contemporary Japanese Americans."--Allison Varzally, author of "Making a Non-White America."
Category: History

Citizen

Author : Claudia Rankine
ISBN : 9781555973483
Genre : Literary Collections
File Size : 48.27 MB
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* Finalist for the National Book Award in Poetry * * Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry * Finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award in Criticism * Winner of the NAACP Image Award * Winner of the L.A. Times Book Prize * Winner of the PEN Open Book Award * ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR: The New Yorker, Boston Globe, The Atlantic, BuzzFeed, NPR. Los Angeles Times, Publishers Weekly, Slate, Time Out New York, Vulture, Refinery 29, and many more . . . A provocative meditation on race, Claudia Rankine's long-awaited follow up to her groundbreaking book Don't Let Me Be Lonely: An American Lyric. Claudia Rankine's bold new book recounts mounting racial aggressions in ongoing encounters in twenty-first-century daily life and in the media. Some of these encounters are slights, seeming slips of the tongue, and some are intentional offensives in the classroom, at the supermarket, at home, on the tennis court with Serena Williams and the soccer field with Zinedine Zidane, online, on TV-everywhere, all the time. The accumulative stresses come to bear on a person's ability to speak, perform, and stay alive. Our addressability is tied to the state of our belonging, Rankine argues, as are our assumptions and expectations of citizenship. In essay, image, and poetry, Citizen is a powerful testament to the individual and collective effects of racism in our contemporary, often named "post-race" society.
Category: Literary Collections

Fighting For Life

Author : S. Josephine Baker
ISBN : 9781590177068
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 24.11 MB
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"New York's lower east side was said to be the most densely populated square mile on the face of the earth in the 1890s. City health inspectors called the neighborhood "the suicide ward" and referred to one particular tenement--in an official Health Department report, no less--as an "out and out hog pen." Diarrhea epidemics raged each summer, killing thousands of city children. Sweatshop babies with smallpox and typhus dozed in garment heaps destined for fashionable Broadway shops. Desperate mothers paced the streets to soothe their feverish children, and white mourning cloths hung from every building. A third of children living in the slums died before their fifth birthday. By 1911, the child death rate had fallen sharply and The New York Times hailed the city as the healthiest on earth. In this witty and highly personal autobiography, public health crusader Dr. Sara Josephine Baker explains how this remarkable transformation was achieved. By the time she retired from the New York City Health Department in 1923, Baker was famous worldwide for saving the lives of 90,000 children. The public health programs Baker developed, many still in use today, have probably saved the lives of millions more. She also fought for women's suffrage, toured Russia in the 1930s, and captured "Typhoid" Mary Malone, twice. She was also an astute observer of her times, and Fighting for Life is one of the most honest, compassionate memoirs of American medicine ever written"--Provided by publisher.
Category: Biography & Autobiography

Imaging Japanese America

Author : Elena Tajima Creef
ISBN : 9780814716229
Genre : Art
File Size : 58.31 MB
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As we have been reminded by the renewed acceptance of racial profiling, and the detention and deportation of hundreds of immigrants of Arab and Muslim descent on unknown charges following September 11, in times of national crisis we take refuge in the visual construction of citizenship in order to imagine ourselves as part of a larger, cohesive national American community. Beginning with another moment of national historical trauma—December 7, 1941 and the subsequent internment of 120,000 Japanese Americans—Imaging Japanese America unearths stunning and seldom seen photographs of Japanese Americans by the likes of Dorothea Lange, Ansel Adams, and Toyo Mitatake. In turn, Elena Tajima Creef examines the perspective from inside, as visualized by Mine Okubo's Maus-like dramatic cartoon and by films made by Asian Americans about the internment experience. She then traces the ways in which contemporary representations of Japanese Americans in popular culture are inflected by the politics of historical memory from World War II. Creef closes with a look at the representation of the multiracial Japanese American body at the turn of the millennium.
Category: Art

Civil War Poetry

Author : Paul Negri
ISBN : 9780486112176
Genre : Poetry
File Size : 24.30 MB
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A superb selection of poems from both sides of the American Civil War features more than 75 inspired works by Melville, Emerson, Longfellow, Whittier, Whitman, and many others.
Category: Poetry

Less Is More

Author : Dawn Matus
ISBN : OCLC:957326871
Genre :
File Size : 49.72 MB
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