BOARDING SCHOOL SEASONS AMERICAN INDIAN FAMILIES 1900 1940 NORTH AMERICAN INDIAN PROSE AWARD

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Boarding School Seasons

Author : Brenda J. Child
ISBN : 0803212305
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 90.39 MB
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Looks at the experiences of children at three off-reservation Indian boarding schools in the early years of the twentieth century.
Category: Social Science

Learning To Write Indian

Author : Amelia V. Katanski
ISBN : 0806138521
Genre : History
File Size : 80.97 MB
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Examines Indian boarding school narratives and their impact on the Native literary tradition from 1879 to the present Indian boarding schools were the lynchpins of a federally sponsored system of forced assimilation. These schools, located off-reservation, took Native children from their families and tribes for years at a time in an effort to “kill” their tribal cultures, languages, and religions. In Learning to Write “Indian,” Amelia V. Katanski investigates the impact of the Indian boarding school experience on the American Indian literary tradition through an examination of turn-of-the-century student essays and autobiographies as well as contemporary plays, novels, and poetry. Many recent books have focused on the Indian boarding school experience. Among these Learning to Write “Indian” is unique in that it looks at writings about the schools as literature, rather than as mere historical evidence.
Category: History

Away From Home

Author : Margaret Archuleta
ISBN : 0934351627
Genre : Education
File Size : 31.14 MB
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Shares the stories of American Indians surviving the institutional life of boarding schools, descring Native Americans' faith, love for their heritage, resilience, and ability to learn from hard times.
Category: Education

Pipestone

Author : Adam Fortunate Eagle
ISBN : 9780806184258
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 62.33 MB
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A renowned activist recalls his childhood years in an Indian boarding school Best known as a leader of the Indian takeover of Alcatraz Island in 1969, Adam Fortunate Eagle now offers an unforgettable memoir of his years as a young student at Pipestone Indian Boarding School in Minnesota. In this rare firsthand account, Fortunate Eagle lives up to his reputation as a “contrary warrior” by disproving the popular view of Indian boarding schools as bleak and prisonlike. Fortunate Eagle attended Pipestone between 1935 and 1945, just as Commissioner of Indian Affairs John Collier’s pluralist vision was reshaping the federal boarding school system to promote greater respect for Native cultures and traditions. But this book is hardly a dry history of the late boarding school era. Telling this story in the voice of his younger self, the author takes us on a delightful journey into his childhood and the inner world of the boarding school. Along the way, he shares anecdotes of dormitory culture, student pranks, and warrior games. Although Fortunate Eagle recognizes Pipestone’s shortcomings, he describes his time there as nothing less than “a little bit of heaven.” Were all Indian boarding schools the dispiriting places that history has suggested? This book allows readers to decide for themselves.
Category: Biography & Autobiography

American Indian Children At School 1850 1930

Author : Michael C. Coleman
ISBN : 1604730099
Genre : Education
File Size : 22.55 MB
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From more than a hundred autobiographical accounts written by American Indians recalling their schooling in government and missionary institutions this book recovers a perspective that was almost lost. In a system of pedagogy that was alien to their culture these and hundreds of others were wrested as youngsters from their tribal life and regimented to become American citizens. In the process of enlightening them to western codes and values, their memories of ethnic life were intentionally obscured for what was to believed to be the greater good of the nation. Drawing upon these Native American reminiscences reveals how young Indians responded to a system that attempted to eradicate the tribal codes that had nourished them. The Christian curriculum, the military-style discipline, the white staff of teachers and administrators, and the work-for-study demands were alien and bewildering to them, especially during their first days at the institutions. The former pupils recall myriad kinds of adaptability, resistance, motivation, and rejection, as well as the many problems readjusting to changing tribal life upon their return from school. Here the history of the eighty-year epoch of such institutionalized schooling is placed in careful focus. Recounting this experience from the pupil's eyeview and comparing it with contemporary sources by white authors make this book a testament to the critical value of long-term autobiographical memory in the writing of history.
Category: Education

Native America

Author : Michael Leroy Oberg
ISBN : 9781118714379
Genre : History
File Size : 30.76 MB
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This history of Native Americans, from the period of first contact to the present day, offers an important variation to existing studies by placing the lives and experiences of Native American communities at the center of the narrative. Presents an innovative approach to Native American history by placing individual native communities and their experiences at the center of the study Following a first chapter that deals with creation myths, the remainder of the narrative is structured chronologically, covering over 600 years from the point of first contact to the present day Illustrates the great diversity in American Indian culture and emphasizes the importance of Native Americans in the history of North America Provides an excellent survey for courses in Native American history Includes maps, photographs, a timeline, questions for discussion, and “A Closer Focus” textboxes that provide biographies of individuals and that elaborate on the text, exposing students to issues of race, class, and gender
Category: History

Negotiators Of Change

Author : Nancy Shoemaker
ISBN : 9781136042621
Genre : History
File Size : 42.48 MB
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Negotiators of Change covers the history of ten tribal groups including the Cherokee, Iroquois and Navajo -- as well as tribes with less known histories such as the Yakima, Ute, and Pima-Maricopa. The book contests the idea that European colonialization led to a loss of Native American women's power, and instead presents a more complex picture of the adaption to, and subversion of, the economic changes introduced by Europeans. The essays also discuss the changing meainings of motherhood, women's roles and differing gender ideologies within this context.
Category: History

Broken Circle

Author : Theodore Fontaine
ISBN : 9781926613666
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 70.64 MB
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Theodore Fontaine lost his family and freedom before his seventh birthday, when his parents were forced to leave him at an Indian residential school. Twelve years later, he left school frozen at the emotional age of seven. He was confused, angry and conflicted, on a path of self-destruction. At age 29, he emerged from this blackness and began a journey of self-exploration and healing. In this powerful and poignant memoir, Theodore examines the impact of the loss of his language and culture and, most important, the loss of his family and community. He goes beyond details of the abuse of Indian children to provide readers with an understanding of why most residential-school survivors have stress disorders and why succeeding generations of First Nations children suffer from this chapter in history. Told as remembrances described with insights that have evolved in his healing, his story resonates with his resolve to help himself and other survivors and to share his enduring belief that one can pick up the shattered pieces and use them for good.
Category: Biography & Autobiography

To Change Them Forever

Author : Clyde Ellis
ISBN : 0806128259
Genre : History
File Size : 28.41 MB
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Between 1893 and 1920 the U.S. government attempted to transform Kiowa children by immersing them in the forced assimilation program that lay at the heart of that era's Indian policy. Committed to civilizing Indians according to Anglo-American standards of conduct, the Indian Service effected the government's vision of a new Indian race that would be white in every way except skin color. Reservation boarding schools represented an especially important component in that assimilationist campaign. The Rainy Mountain School, on the Kiowa-Comanche-Apache Reservation in western Oklahoma, provides an example of how theory and reality collided in a remote corner of the American West. Rainy Mountain's history reveals much about the form and function of the Indian policy and its consequences for the Kiowa children who attended the school. In To Change Them Forever Clyde Ellis combines a survey of changing government policy with a discussion of response and accommodation by the Kiowa people. Unwilling to surrender their identity, Kiowas nonetheless accepted the adaptations required by the schools and survived the attempt to change them into something they did not wish to become. Rainy Mountain became a focal point for Kiowa society.
Category: History

Indigenous Women And Work

Author : Carol Williams
ISBN : 9780252037153
Genre : History
File Size : 64.57 MB
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The essays in Indigenous Women and Work create a transnational and comparative dialogue on the history of the productive and reproductive lives and circumstances of Indigenous women from the late nineteenth century to the present in the United States, Australia, New Zealand/Aotearoa, and Canada. Surveying the spectrum of Indigenous women's lives and circumstances as workers, both waged and unwaged, the contributors offer varied perspectives on the ways women's work has contributed to the survival of communities in the face of ongoing tensions between assimilation and colonization. They also interpret how individual nations have conceived of Indigenous women as workers and, in turn, convert these assumptions and definitions into policy and practice. The essays address the intersection of Indigenous, women's, and labor history, but will also be useful to contemporary policy makers, tribal activists, and Native American women's advocacy associations. Contributors are Tracey Banivanua Mar, Marlene Brant Castellano, Cathleen D. Cahill, Brenda J. Child, Sherry Farrell Racette, Chris Friday, Aroha Harris, Faye HeavyShield, Heather A. Howard, Margaret D. Jacobs, Alice Littlefield, Cybèle Locke, Mary Jane Logan McCallum, Kathy M'Closkey, Colleen O'Neill, Beth H. Piatote, Susan Roy, Lynette Russell, Joan Sangster, Ruth Taylor, and Carol Williams.
Category: History