Black Culture And Black Consciousness

Author : Lawrence W. Levine
ISBN : 9780195305692
Genre : History
File Size : 80.97 MB
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A critical reconstruction of African-American folk thought in the United States between the 1840s and 1950, defining the main features of preemancipated slave thought and the effects of freedom upon that thought.
Category: History

Die Seelen Der Schwarzen

Author : William E. B. Du Bois
ISBN : 3936086079
Genre : African Americans
File Size : 66.89 MB
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Category: African Americans

Schwarzes Amerika

Author : Jochen Meissner
ISBN : 3406562256
Genre : Blacks
File Size : 53.82 MB
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Category: Blacks

Southern Music American Music

Author : Bill C. Malone
ISBN : 9780813149158
Genre : Music
File Size : 87.41 MB
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Southern Music/American Music is the first book to investigate the facets of American music from the South and the many popular forms that emerged from it. In this substantially revised and updated edition, Bill C. Malone and David Stricklin bring this classic work into the twenty-first century, including new material on recent phenomena such as the huge success of the soundtrack to O Brother, Where Art Thou? and the renewed popularity of Southern music, as well as important new artists Lucinda Williams, Alejandro Escovedo, and the Dixie Chicks, among others. Extensive bibliographic notes and a new suggested listening guide complete this essential study.
Category: Music

The Cultural Turn In U S History

Author : James W. Cook
ISBN : 9780226115078
Genre : History
File Size : 38.53 MB
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An account of one of the most dominant trends in recent historical writing, this book takes stock of the field even as it showcases exemplars of its practice. Taken together, the essays present a broad picture of the state of American cultural-historical scholarship.
Category: History

The New Encyclopedia Of Southern Culture

Author : Michael Montgomery
ISBN : 9781469616629
Genre : Reference
File Size : 30.79 MB
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The fifth volume of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture explores language and dialect in the South, including English and its numerous regional variants, Native American languages, and other non-English languages spoken over time by the region's immigrant communities. Among the more than sixty entries are eleven on indigenous languages and major essays on French, Spanish, and German. Each of these provides both historical and contemporary perspectives, identifying the language's location, number of speakers, vitality, and sample distinctive features. The book acknowledges the role of immigration in spreading features of Southern English to other regions and countries and in bringing linguistic influences from Europe and Africa to Southern English. The fascinating patchwork of English dialects is also fully presented, from African American English, Gullah, and Cajun English to the English spoken in Appalachia, the Ozarks, the Outer Banks, the Chesapeake Bay Islands, Charleston, and elsewhere. Topical entries discuss ongoing changes in the pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar of English in the increasingly mobile South, as well as naming patterns, storytelling, preaching styles, and politeness, all of which deal with ways language is woven into southern culture.
Category: Reference

The Souls Of Black Folk

Author : Dolan Hubbard
ISBN : 9780826217332
Genre : History
File Size : 49.4 MB
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Published in 1903, The Souls of Black Folk by W. E. B. Du Bois was an immediate achievement. More than a hundred years later, the influence of Du Bois's critique of the political, social, and economic encumbrances imposed upon blacks in Reconstruction and post-Reconstruction America can still be felt. “The Souls of Black Folk”: One Hundred Years Later is the first collection of essays to examine Du Bois's work from a variety of academic perspectives, including aesthetics, art history, communications, music, political science, psychology, history, and the classics. Scholars, teachers, and students of American studies and African American studies will find this collection an essential overview of a book that changed the course of American intellectual history.
Category: History

To Make Our World Anew

Author : Robin D. G. Kelley
ISBN : 9780199839018
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 45.91 MB
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Written by the most prominent of the new generation of historians, this superb volume offers the most up-to-date and authoritative account available of African-American history, ranging from the first Africans brought as slaves into the Americas, to today's black filmmakers and politicians. Here is a panoramic view of African American life, rich in gripping first-person accounts and short character sketches that invite readers to relive history as African Americans experienced it. We begin in Africa, with the growth of the slave trade, and follow the forced migration of what is estimated to be between ten and twenty million people, witnessing the terrible human cost of slavery in the colonies of England and Spain. We read of the Haitian Revolution, which ended victoriously in 1804 with the birth of the first independent black nation in the New World, and of slave rebellions and resistance in the United States in the years leading up to the Civil War. There are vivid accounts of the Civil War and Reconstruction years, the backlash of notorious "Jim Crow" laws and mob lynchings, and the founding of key black educational institutions. The contributors also trace the migration of blacks to the major cities, the birth of the Harlem Renaissance, the hardships of the Great Depression and the service of African Americans in World War II, the struggle for Civil Rights in the 1950s and '60s, and the emergence of today's black middle class. From Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass to Martin Luther King, Jr., and Louis Farrakhan, To Make Our World Anew is an unforgettable portrait of a people.
Category: Social Science

Why The Civil War Came

Author : Gabor S. Boritt
ISBN : 9780199879625
Genre : History
File Size : 54.98 MB
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In the early morning of April 12, 1861, Captain George S. James ordered the bombardment of Fort Sumter, beginning a war that would last four horrific years and claim a staggering number of lives. Since that fateful day, the debate over the causes of the American Civil War has never ceased. What events were instrumental in bringing it about? How did individuals and institutions function? What did Northerners and Southerners believe in the decades of strife preceding the war? What steps did they take to avoid war? Indeed, was the great armed conflict avoidable at all? Why the Civil War Came brings a talented chorus of voices together to recapture the feel of a very different time and place, helping the reader to grasp more fully the commencement of our bloodiest war. From William W. Freehling's discussion of the peculiarities of North American slavery to Charles Royster's disturbing piece on the combatants' savage readiness to fight, the contributors bring to life the climate of a country on the brink of disaster. Mark Summers, for instance, depicts the tragically jubilant first weeks of Northern recruitment, when Americans on both sides were as yet unaware of the hellish slaughter that awaited them. Glenna Matthews underscores the important war-catalyzing role played by extraordinary public women, who proved that neither side of the Mason-Dixon line was as patriarchal as is thought. David Blight reveals an African-American world that "knew what time it was," and welcomed war. And Gabor Boritt examines the struggle's central figure, Lincoln himself, illuminating in the years leading up to the war a blindness on the future president's part, an unwillingness to confront the looming calamity that was about to smash the nation asunder. William E. Gienapp notes perhaps the most unsettling fact about the Civil War, that democratic institutions could not resolve the slavery issue without resorting to violence on an epic scale. With gripping detail, Why the Civil War Came takes readers back to a country fraught with bitterness, confusion, and hatred--a country ripe for a war of unprecedented bloodshed--to show why democracy failed, and violence reigned.
Category: History