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Becoming Mexican American

Author : George J. Sanchez
ISBN : 0195096487
Genre : History
File Size : 46.86 MB
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Twentieth century Los Angeles has been the focus of one of the most profound and complex interactions between distinct cultures in U.S. history. In this pioneering study, Sanchez explores how Mexican immigrants "Americanized" themselves in order to fit in, thereby losing part of their own culture.
Category: History

En Aquel Entonces

Author : Manuel G. Gonzales
ISBN : 0253337658
Genre : History
File Size : 76.52 MB
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En Aquel Entonces [In Those Days] Readings in Mexican-American History Edited by Manuel G. Gonzales and Cynthia M. Gonzales An interdisciplinary anthology covering diverse aspects of the Mexican-American experience in the United States. The advent of Chicano Studies in the 1960s spawned a tremendous interest in the history of Mexicans in the United States. Committed to a multidisciplinary approach from the very outset, Chicano and Chicana scholars used a variety of perspectives to explain the Mexican-American past, but much of this work has not been readily available to students. En Aquel Entonces is intended as a partial solution to the problem, an anthology that brings together 31 of the most innovative journal articles published during the past four decades. These articles, representing several disciplines, provide students of history with a panoramic portrait of Mexicanos in the United States while at the same time introducing them to Chicana/o historiography. Each of the essays has been carefully edited in consultation with its author to present a text that is more accessible to students and general readers Manuel G. Gonzales is Professor of History at Diablo Valley College and author of Andrea Costa and the Rise of Socialism in the Romagna, The Hispanic Elite of the Southwest, and Mexicanos: A History of Mexicans in the United States (Indiana University Press). Cynthia M. Gonzales is an Education Specialist at Ygnacio Learning Center in Walnut Creek, California and was Director of Education at Walnut Creek Hospital from 1985–1998. Contents Introduction by Manuel G. Gonzales I. Genesis of a People: Before 1848 Presidarias y Pobladoras: The Journey North and Life in Frontier California, Antonia I. Castaneda Honor Ideology, Marriage Negotiation, and Class-Gender Domination in New Mexico, 1690-1846, Ramon A. Gutierrez Gnats, Goods, and Greasers: Mexican Merchants on the Santa Fe Trail, David A. Sandoval Rancho Life in Alta California, Federico A. Sanchez Discovering the Tejano Community in "Early" Texas, Jesus F. de la Teja The Origins of Anti-Mexican Sentiment in the United States, Raymund A. Paredes II. Gringos versus Greasers: 1848–1900 In Re Ricardo Rodriguez: An Attempt at Chicano Disfranchisement in San Antonio, 1896–1897, Arnoldo De Leon Mexican-American Land Grant Adjudication, Armando C. Alonzo The Barrioization of Nineteenth-Century Mexican Californians: From Landowners to Laborers, Antonio Rios-Bustamante Tucsonenses and Angelenos: A Socio-Economic Study of Two Mexican-American Barrios, 1860–1880, Richard Griswold del Castillo Mexican American Catholicism in the Southwest: The Transformation of a Popular Religion, Alberto L. Pulido Carlos I. Velasco and the Defense of Mexican Rights in Territorial Arizona, Manuel G. Gonzales III. The Great Migration: 1900–1940 Chicanos in Chicago: A Brief History, Louise Ano Nuevo Kerr Settlers, Sojourners, and Proletarians: Social Formation in the Great Plains Sugar Beets Industry, 1890–1940, Dennis Nodin Valdes The Urbanization of Southwestern Chicanos in the Early 20th Century, Ricardo Romo Regionalism, Politics, and Gender in Southwest History: The League of United Latin American Citizens' Expansion into New Mexico from Texas, 1929–1945, Cynthia E. Orozco Labor Threat and Industrialized Agriculture in California: The Case of the 1933 San Joaquin Valley Cotton Strike, Ramon D. Chacon Women, Work, and Community in the Mexican Colonias of the Southern California Citrus Belt, Gilbert G. Gonzalez Texas Newspapers and Chicana Workers' Activism, 1919–1974, Irene Ledesma IV. The Rise of the Middle Class: 1940–1965 Braceros in the Pacific Northwest: Laborers on the Domestic Front, 1942–1947, Erasmo Gamboa Mexican Americans on the Home Front: Community Organizations in Arizona during World War II, Christine Marin A Promise Fulfilled: Mexican Cannery Workers
Category: History

East Los Angeles

Author : Ricardo Romo
ISBN : 0292720416
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 46.80 MB
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This is the story of the largest Mexican-American community in the United States, the city within a city known as "East Los Angeles." How did this barrio of over one million men and women—occupying an area greater than Manhattan or Washington D.C.—come to be? Although promoted early in this century as a workers' paradise, Los Angeles fared poorly in attracting European immigrants and American blue-collar workers. Wages were low, and these workers were understandably reluctant to come to a city which was also troubled by labor strife. Mexicans made up the difference, arriving in the city in massive numbers. Who these Mexicans were and the conditions that caused them to leave their own country are revealed in East Los Angeles. The author examines how they adjusted to life in one of the fastest-growing cities in the United States, how they fared in this country's labor market, and the problems of segregation and prejudice they confronted. Ricardo Romo is associate professor of history at the University of Texas at Austin.
Category: Social Science

Walls And Mirrors

Author : David G. Gutiérrez
ISBN : 0520916867
Genre : History
File Size : 45.62 MB
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Covering more than one hundred years of American history, Walls and Mirrors examines the ways that continuous immigration from Mexico transformed—and continues to shape—the political, social, and cultural life of the American Southwest. Taking a fresh approach to one of the most divisive political issues of our time, David Gutiérrez explores the ways that nearly a century of steady immigration from Mexico has shaped ethnic politics in California and Texas, the two largest U.S. border states. Drawing on an extensive body of primary and secondary sources, Gutiérrez focuses on the complex ways that their pattern of immigration influenced Mexican Americans' sense of social and cultural identity—and, as a consequence, their politics. He challenges the most cherished American myths about U.S. immigration policy, pointing out that, contrary to rhetoric about "alien invasions," U.S. government and regional business interests have actively recruited Mexican and other foreign workers for over a century, thus helping to establish and perpetuate the flow of immigrants into the United States. In addition, Gutiérrez offers a new interpretation of the debate over assimilation and multiculturalism in American society. Rejecting the notion of the melting pot, he explores the ways that ethnic Mexicans have resisted assimilation and fought to create a cultural space for themselves in distinctive ethnic communities throughout the southwestern United States.
Category: History

Making San Francisco American

Author : Barbara Berglund
ISBN : UVA:X030262506
Genre : History
File Size : 90.94 MB
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The San Francisco that rose from the ashes of the 1906 earthquake and fire was a city of rigid social stratification--a city determined to contain its diverse and disorderly rough-and-tumble past some sixty years after its acquisition by the United States. Barbara Berglund vividly describes San Francisco's rapid evolution from Mexican outpost to crown jewel of America's western empire, taking readers back to an earlier and more chaotic time when class definitions and social conventions were much more fluid. Berglund argues that the city's rapid rise from a multicultural boomtown to a racially and socially stratified metropolis reflected the careful efforts of a nascent elite to order its inhabitants through political and cultural means. Berglund analyzes the cultural spaces that showcased the contests that would determine the social order and who defined it. The book's central chapters provide snapshots of the micro-workings of power of five key cultural frontiers: restaurants, hotels, and boardinghouses; places of amusement, ranging from the brothels of the Barbary Coast to the Pacific Museum of Anatomy and Science; Chinatown's tourist terrain; the Mechanics' Institute's annual fairs; and the 1894 California Midwinter International Exposition--the first such expo held west of Chicago and an image-building opportunity for the city's elites. By focusing on the role of cultural frontiers in the urban west, Berglund offers a new take on western history that explores the role of market-driven cultural institutions, demonstrating that the market was as important as the state in structuring power relationships in nineteenth-century imperial America. She shows that control over meaningsascribed to race, class, and gender--especially those generated in the city's cultural spaces--was critical to the incorporation of San Francisco into the fabric of the American nation.
Category: History

Roots Too

Author : Matthew Frye JACOBSON
ISBN : 0674018982
Genre : History
File Size : 28.55 MB
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In the 1970s, white ethnics mobilized around a new version of the epic tale of plucky immigrants making their way in the New World through the sweat of their brow. Although this turn to ethnicity was for many an individual search for familial and psychological identity, Roots Too establishes a broader white social and political consensus arising in response to the political language of the Civil Rights movement.
Category: History

L A City Limits

Author : Josh Sides
ISBN : 0520939867
Genre : History
File Size : 36.48 MB
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In 1964 an Urban League survey ranked Los Angeles as the most desirable city for African Americans to live in. In 1965 the city burst into flames during one of the worst race riots in the nation's history. How the city came to such a pass—embodying both the best and worst of what urban America offered black migrants from the South—is the story told for the first time in this history of modern black Los Angeles. A clear-eyed and compelling look at black struggles for equality in L.A.'s neighborhoods, schools, and workplaces from the Great Depression to our day, L.A. City Limits critically refocuses the ongoing debate about the origins of America's racial and urban crisis. Challenging previous analysts' near-exclusive focus on northern "rust-belt" cities devastated by de-industrialization, Josh Sides asserts that the cities to which black southerners migrated profoundly affected how they fared. He shows how L.A.'s diverse racial composition, dispersive geography, and dynamic postwar economy often created opportunities—and limits—quite different from those encountered by blacks in the urban North.
Category: History

From Out Of The Shadows

Author : Vicki L. Ruiz
ISBN : 0199705453
Genre : History
File Size : 71.2 MB
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From Out of the Shadows was the first full study of Mexican-American women in the twentieth century. Beginning with the first wave of Mexican women crossing the border early in the century, historian Vicki L. Ruiz reveals the struggles they have faced and the communities they have built. In a narrative enhanced by interviews and personal stories, she shows how from labor camps, boxcar settlements, and urban barrios, Mexican women nurtured families, worked for wages, built extended networks, and participated in community associations--efforts that helped Mexican Americans find their own place in America. She also narrates the tensions that arose between generations, as the parents tried to rein in young daughters eager to adopt American ways. Finally, the book highlights the various forms of political protest initiated by Mexican-American women, including civil rights activity and protests against the war in Vietnam. For this new edition of From Out of the Shadows, Ruiz has written an afterword that continues the story of the Mexicana experience in the United States, as well as outlines new additions to the growing field of Latina history.
Category: History

Memories Of Chicano History

Author : Mario T. García
ISBN : 0520916549
Genre : History
File Size : 58.51 MB
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Who is Bert Corona? Though not readily identified by most Americans, nor indeed by many Mexican Americans, Corona is a man of enormous political commitment whose activism has spanned much of this century. Now his voice can be heard by the wide audience it deserves. In this landmark publication—the first autobiography by a major figure in Chicano history—Bert Corona relates his life story. Corona was born in El Paso in 1918. Inspired by his parents' participation in the Mexican Revolution, he dedicated his life to fighting economic and social injustice. An early labor organizer among ethnic communities in southern California, Corona has agitated for labor and civil rights since the 1940s. His efforts continue today in campaigns to organize undocumented immigrants. This book evolved from a three-year oral history project between Bert Corona and historian Mario T. García. The result is a testimonio, a collaborative autobiography in which historical memories are preserved more through oral traditions than through written documents. Corona's story represents a collective memory of the Mexican-American community's struggle against discrimination and racism. His narration and García's analysis together provide a journey into the Mexican-American world. Bert Corona's reflections offer us an invaluable glimpse at the lifework of a major grass-roots American leader. His story is further enriched by biographical sketches of others whose names have been little recorded during six decades of American labor history.
Category: History

Desert Immigrants

Author : Mario T. García
ISBN : 0300028830
Genre : History
File Size : 39.90 MB
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Discusses how the Mexican immigrants and their descendants have contributed to America's past, present, and future.
Category: History