Becoming Mexican American

Author : George J. Sanchez
ISBN : 0195096487
Genre : History
File Size : 47.76 MB
Format : PDF
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Twentieth century Los Angeles has been the focus of one of the most profound and complex interactions between distinct cultures in U.S. history. In this pioneering study, Sanchez explores how Mexican immigrants "Americanized" themselves in order to fit in, thereby losing part of their own culture.
Category: History

Studyguide For Becoming Mexican American

Author : Sanchez
ISBN : 142882118X
Genre : Education
File Size : 26.15 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Never HIGHLIGHT a Book Again! Virtually all of the testable terms, concepts, persons, places, and events from the textbook are included. Cram101 Just the FACTS101 studyguides give all of the outlines, highlights, notes, and quizzes for your textbook with optional online comprehensive practice tests. Only Cram101 is Textbook Specific. Accompanys: 9780195096484 .
Category: Education

En Aquel Entonces

Author : Manuel G. Gonzales
ISBN : 0253337658
Genre : History
File Size : 88.39 MB
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En Aquel Entonces [In Those Days] Readings in Mexican-American History Edited by Manuel G. Gonzales and Cynthia M. Gonzales An interdisciplinary anthology covering diverse aspects of the Mexican-American experience in the United States. The advent of Chicano Studies in the 1960s spawned a tremendous interest in the history of Mexicans in the United States. Committed to a multidisciplinary approach from the very outset, Chicano and Chicana scholars used a variety of perspectives to explain the Mexican-American past, but much of this work has not been readily available to students. En Aquel Entonces is intended as a partial solution to the problem, an anthology that brings together 31 of the most innovative journal articles published during the past four decades. These articles, representing several disciplines, provide students of history with a panoramic portrait of Mexicanos in the United States while at the same time introducing them to Chicana/o historiography. Each of the essays has been carefully edited in consultation with its author to present a text that is more accessible to students and general readers Manuel G. Gonzales is Professor of History at Diablo Valley College and author of Andrea Costa and the Rise of Socialism in the Romagna, The Hispanic Elite of the Southwest, and Mexicanos: A History of Mexicans in the United States (Indiana University Press). Cynthia M. Gonzales is an Education Specialist at Ygnacio Learning Center in Walnut Creek, California and was Director of Education at Walnut Creek Hospital from 1985–1998. Contents Introduction by Manuel G. Gonzales I. Genesis of a People: Before 1848 Presidarias y Pobladoras: The Journey North and Life in Frontier California, Antonia I. Castaneda Honor Ideology, Marriage Negotiation, and Class-Gender Domination in New Mexico, 1690-1846, Ramon A. Gutierrez Gnats, Goods, and Greasers: Mexican Merchants on the Santa Fe Trail, David A. Sandoval Rancho Life in Alta California, Federico A. Sanchez Discovering the Tejano Community in "Early" Texas, Jesus F. de la Teja The Origins of Anti-Mexican Sentiment in the United States, Raymund A. Paredes II. Gringos versus Greasers: 1848–1900 In Re Ricardo Rodriguez: An Attempt at Chicano Disfranchisement in San Antonio, 1896–1897, Arnoldo De Leon Mexican-American Land Grant Adjudication, Armando C. Alonzo The Barrioization of Nineteenth-Century Mexican Californians: From Landowners to Laborers, Antonio Rios-Bustamante Tucsonenses and Angelenos: A Socio-Economic Study of Two Mexican-American Barrios, 1860–1880, Richard Griswold del Castillo Mexican American Catholicism in the Southwest: The Transformation of a Popular Religion, Alberto L. Pulido Carlos I. Velasco and the Defense of Mexican Rights in Territorial Arizona, Manuel G. Gonzales III. The Great Migration: 1900–1940 Chicanos in Chicago: A Brief History, Louise Ano Nuevo Kerr Settlers, Sojourners, and Proletarians: Social Formation in the Great Plains Sugar Beets Industry, 1890–1940, Dennis Nodin Valdes The Urbanization of Southwestern Chicanos in the Early 20th Century, Ricardo Romo Regionalism, Politics, and Gender in Southwest History: The League of United Latin American Citizens' Expansion into New Mexico from Texas, 1929–1945, Cynthia E. Orozco Labor Threat and Industrialized Agriculture in California: The Case of the 1933 San Joaquin Valley Cotton Strike, Ramon D. Chacon Women, Work, and Community in the Mexican Colonias of the Southern California Citrus Belt, Gilbert G. Gonzalez Texas Newspapers and Chicana Workers' Activism, 1919–1974, Irene Ledesma IV. The Rise of the Middle Class: 1940–1965 Braceros in the Pacific Northwest: Laborers on the Domestic Front, 1942–1947, Erasmo Gamboa Mexican Americans on the Home Front: Community Organizations in Arizona during World War II, Christine Marin A Promise Fulfilled: Mexican Cannery Workers
Category: History

Desert Immigrants

Author : Mario T. García
ISBN : 0300028830
Genre : History
File Size : 74.44 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
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Discusses how the Mexican immigrants and their descendants have contributed to America's past, present, and future.
Category: History

Whitewashed Adobe

Author : William Deverell
ISBN : 9780520932531
Genre : History
File Size : 89.48 MB
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Chronicling the rise of Los Angeles through shifting ideas of race and ethnicity, William Deverell offers a unique perspective on how the city grew and changed. Whitewashed Adobe considers six different developments in the history of the city—including the cementing of the Los Angeles River, the outbreak of bubonic plague in 1924, and the evolution of America's largest brickyard in the 1920s. In an absorbing narrative supported by a number of previously unpublished period photographs, Deverell shows how a city that was once part of Mexico itself came of age through appropriating—and even obliterating—the region's connections to Mexican places and people. Deverell portrays Los Angeles during the 1850s as a city seething with racial enmity due to the recent war with Mexico. He explains how, within a generation, the city's business interests, looking for a commercially viable way to establish urban identity, borrowed Mexican cultural traditions and put on a carnival called La Fiesta de Los Angeles. He analyzes the subtle ways in which ethnicity came to bear on efforts to corral the unpredictable Los Angeles River and shows how the resident Mexican population was put to work fashioning the modern metropolis. He discusses how Los Angeles responded to the nation's last major outbreak of bubonic plague and concludes by considering the Mission Play, a famed drama tied to regional assumptions about history, progress, and ethnicity. Taking all of these elements into consideration, Whitewashed Adobe uncovers an urban identity—and the power structure that fostered it—with far-reaching implications for contemporary Los Angeles.
Category: History

At America S Gates

Author : Erika Lee
ISBN : 0807863130
Genre : Law
File Size : 45.62 MB
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With the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, Chinese laborers became the first group in American history to be excluded from the United States on the basis of their race and class. This landmark law changed the course of U.S. immigration history, but we know little about its consequences for the Chinese in America or for the United States as a nation of immigrants. At America's Gates is the first book devoted entirely to both Chinese immigrants and the American immigration officials who sought to keep them out. Erika Lee explores how Chinese exclusion laws not only transformed Chinese American lives, immigration patterns, identities, and families but also recast the United States into a "gatekeeping nation." Immigrant identification, border enforcement, surveillance, and deportation policies were extended far beyond any controls that had existed in the United States before. Drawing on a rich trove of historical sources--including recently released immigration records, oral histories, interviews, and letters--Lee brings alive the forgotten journeys, secrets, hardships, and triumphs of Chinese immigrants. Her timely book exposes the legacy of Chinese exclusion in current American immigration control and race relations.
Category: Law

Migra

Author : Kelly Lytle Hernandez
ISBN : 9780520257696
Genre : History
File Size : 21.78 MB
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Reveals the untold history of the United States Border Patrol from its beginnings in 1924 as a small peripheral outfit to its emergence as a large professional police force. This book focuses on the daily challenges of policing the borderlands and bringsto light unexpected partners and forgotten dynamics.--[source unknown].
Category: History

Cuando Jes S Lleg Las Madres Del Ma Z Se Fueron

Author : Ramón A. Gutiérrez
ISBN : 9780804718325
Genre : History
File Size : 46.29 MB
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The author uses marriage to examine the social history of New Mexico between 1500 and 1846
Category: History

Making San Francisco American

Author : Barbara Berglund
ISBN : UVA:X030262506
Genre : History
File Size : 86.25 MB
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The San Francisco that rose from the ashes of the 1906 earthquake and fire was a city of rigid social stratification--a city determined to contain its diverse and disorderly rough-and-tumble past some sixty years after its acquisition by the United States. Barbara Berglund vividly describes San Francisco's rapid evolution from Mexican outpost to crown jewel of America's western empire, taking readers back to an earlier and more chaotic time when class definitions and social conventions were much more fluid. Berglund argues that the city's rapid rise from a multicultural boomtown to a racially and socially stratified metropolis reflected the careful efforts of a nascent elite to order its inhabitants through political and cultural means. Berglund analyzes the cultural spaces that showcased the contests that would determine the social order and who defined it. The book's central chapters provide snapshots of the micro-workings of power of five key cultural frontiers: restaurants, hotels, and boardinghouses; places of amusement, ranging from the brothels of the Barbary Coast to the Pacific Museum of Anatomy and Science; Chinatown's tourist terrain; the Mechanics' Institute's annual fairs; and the 1894 California Midwinter International Exposition--the first such expo held west of Chicago and an image-building opportunity for the city's elites. By focusing on the role of cultural frontiers in the urban west, Berglund offers a new take on western history that explores the role of market-driven cultural institutions, demonstrating that the market was as important as the state in structuring power relationships in nineteenth-century imperial America. She shows that control over meaningsascribed to race, class, and gender--especially those generated in the city's cultural spaces--was critical to the incorporation of San Francisco into the fabric of the American nation.
Category: History