Ar N T I A Woman

Author : Deborah Gray White
ISBN : 0393314812
Genre : History
File Size : 25.28 MB
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Explores the contributions made by enslaved women to the family's economy and suggests they achieved a greater degree of equality with their men than white women
Category: History

Ar N T I A Woman Female Slaves In The Plantation South Revised Edition

Author : Deborah Gray White
ISBN : 9780393343526
Genre : History
File Size : 87.60 MB
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"This is one of those rare books that quickly became the standard work in its field. Professor White has done justice to the complexity of her subject."—Anne Firor Scott, Duke University Living with the dual burdens of racism and sexism, slave women in the plantation South assumed roles within the family and community that contrasted sharply with traditional female roles in the larger American society. This new edition of Ar'n't I a Woman? reviews and updates the scholarship on slave women and the slave family, exploring new ways of understanding the intersection of race and gender and comparing the myths that stereotyped female slaves with the realities of their lives. Above all, this groundbreaking study shows us how black women experienced freedom in the Reconstruction South — their heroic struggle to gain their rights, hold their families together, resist economic and sexual oppression, and maintain their sense of womanhood against all odds.
Category: History

Ain T I A Woman

Author : Deborah Gray White
ISBN : UOM:35112100443540
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 69.40 MB
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Category: Social Science

Let My People Go

Author : Deborah Gray White
ISBN : 9780195087697
Genre : African Americans
File Size : 48.64 MB
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Discusses the lives of African Americans from the early years of the nineteenth century to the start of the Civil War.
Category: African Americans

Within The Plantation Household

Author : Elizabeth Fox-Genovese
ISBN : 9780807864227
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 68.79 MB
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Documenting the difficult class relations between women slaveholders and slave women, this study shows how class and race as well as gender shaped women's experiences and determined their identities. Drawing upon massive research in diaries, letters, memoirs, and oral histories, the author argues that the lives of antebellum southern women, enslaved and free, differed fundamentally from those of northern women and that it is not possible to understand antebellum southern women by applying models derived from New England sources.
Category: Social Science

Too Heavy A Load

Author : Deborah Gray White
ISBN : 039331992X
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 20.23 MB
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Chronicles one hundred years in the struggle of African American women to attain equality and to establish a resistance to persistent racism and negative stereotyping
Category: Social Science

Beyond Nature S Housekeepers

Author : Nancy C. Unger
ISBN : 9780199986002
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 51.45 MB
Format : PDF
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From pre-Columbian times to the environmental justice movements of the present, women and men frequently responded to the environment and environmental issues in profoundly different ways. Although both environmental history and women's history are flourishing fields, explorations of the synergy produced by the interplay between environment and sex, sexuality, and gender are just beginning. Offering more than biographies of great women in environmental history, Beyond Nature's Housekeepers examines the intersections that shaped women's unique environmental concerns and activism and that framed the way the larger culture responded. Women featured include Native Americans, colonists, enslaved field workers, pioneers, homemakers, municipal housekeepers, immigrants, hunters, nature writers, soil conservationists, scientists, migrant laborers, nuclear protestors, and environmental justice activists. As women, they fared, thought, and acted in ways complicated by social, political, and economic norms, as well as issues of sexuality and childbearing. Nancy C. Unger reveals how women have played a unique role, for better and sometimes for worse, in the shaping of the American environment.
Category: Social Science

Runaway Slaves

Author : John Hope Franklin
ISBN : 9780199840250
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 44.12 MB
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From John Hope Franklin, America's foremost African American historian, comes this groundbreaking analysis of slave resistance and escape. A sweeping panorama of plantation life before the Civil War, this book reveals that slaves frequently rebelled against their masters and ran away from their plantations whenever they could. For generations, important aspects about slave life on the plantations of the American South have remained shrouded. Historians thought, for instance, that slaves were generally pliant and resigned to their roles as human chattel, and that racial violence on the plantation was an aberration. In this precedent setting book, John Hope Franklin and Loren Schweninger demonstrate that, contrary to popular belief, significant numbers of slaves did in fact frequently rebel against their masters and struggled to attain their freedom. By surveying a wealth of documents, such as planters' records, petitions to county courts and state legislatures, and local newspapers, this book shows how slaves resisted, when, where, and how they escaped, where they fled to, how long they remained in hiding, and how they survived away from the plantation. Of equal importance, it examines the reactions of the white slaveholding class, revealing how they marshaled considerable effort to prevent runaways, meted out severe punishments, and established patrols to hunt down escaped slaves. Reflecting a lifetime of thought by our leading authority in African American history, this book provides the key to truly understanding the relationship between slaveholders and the runaways who challenged the system--illuminating as never before the true nature of the South's "most peculiar institution."
Category: Social Science

How Race Is Made

Author : Mark M. Smith
ISBN : 0807877271
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 61.95 MB
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For at least two centuries, argues Mark Smith, white southerners used all of their senses--not just their eyes--to construct racial difference and define race. His provocative analysis, extending from the colonial period to the mid-twentieth century, shows how whites of all classes used the artificial binary of "black" and "white" to justify slavery and erect the political, legal, and social structure of segregation. Based on painstaking research, How Race Is Made is a highly original, always frank, and often disturbing book. After enslaved Africans were initially brought to America, the offspring of black and white sexual relationships (consensual and forced) complicated the purely visual sense of racial typing. As mixed-race people became more and more common and as antebellum race-based slavery and then postbellum racial segregation became central to southern society, white southerners asserted that they could rely on their other senses--touch, smell, sound, and taste--to identify who was "white" and who was not. Sensory racial stereotypes were invented and irrational, but at every turn, Smith shows, these constructions of race, immune to logic, signified difference and perpetuated inequality. Smith argues that the history of southern race relations and the construction of racial difference on which that history is built cannot be understood fully on the basis of sight alone. In order to come to terms with the South's past and present, Smith says, we must explore the sensory dynamics underpinning the deeply emotional construction of race. How Race Is Made takes a bold step toward that understanding.
Category: Social Science

Far More Terrible For Women

Author : Patrick Minges
ISBN : 9780895875020
Genre : African American women
File Size : 37.84 MB
Format : PDF
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Far More Terrible for Women seeks to broaden the discussion by presenting 27 narratives of female ex-slaves. Editor Patrick Minges combed the WPA interviews of the 1930s for those of women, selecting a range of stories that give a taste of the unique challenges, complexities, and cruelties that were the lot of females under the "peculiar institution."
Category: African American women