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Author : Robert L. Welsch
ISBN : 0199947597
Genre :
File Size : 81.89 MB
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From the authors who wrote the highly acclaimed Cultural Anthropology: Asking Question About Humanity, this ground-breaking general anthropology text--co-written with renowned scholar Agust�n Fuentes--takes a holistic approach that emphasizes critical thinking, active learning, and applying anthropology to solve contemporary human problems. Building on the classical foundations of the discipline, Anthropology: Asking Questions about Human Origins, Diversity, and Culture shows students how anthropology is connected to such current topics as food, health and medicine, and the environment. Full of relevant examples and current topics--with a focus on contemporary problems and questions--the book demonstrates the diversity and dynamism of anthropology today.

Cultural Anthropology

Author : Robert L. Welsch
ISBN : 0199925720
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 50.84 MB
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What is cultural anthropology, and how is it relevant in today's world? Robert L. Welsch and Luis A. Vivanco's Cultural Anthropology: Asking Questions About Humanity uses a questions-based approach to teach students how to think anthropologically, helping them view cultural issues and everyday experiences as an anthropologist might. Inspired by the common observation that 99 percent of a good answer is a good question, Cultural Anthropology: Asking Questions About Humanity combines a question-centered pedagogy with the topics typically covered in an introductory course. It emphasizes up front what the discipline of anthropology knows and which issues are in debate, and how a cultural perspective is relevant to understanding social, political, and economic dynamics in the contemporary world. Cultural Anthropology: Asking Questions About Humanity also represents an effort to close the gap between the realities of the discipline today and traditional views that are taught at the introductory level by bringing classic anthropological examples, cases, and analyses to bear on contemporary questions.
Category: Social Science

Asking Questions About Cultural Anthropology

Author : Robert L. Welsch
ISBN : 0199926905
Genre :
File Size : 67.91 MB
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Unlike textbooks that emphasize the memorization of facts, Asking Questions About Cultural Anthropology: A Concise Introduction teaches students how to think anthropologically, helping them view cultural issues as an anthropologist might. This approach demonstrates how anthropological thinking can be used as a tool for deciphering everyday experiences. The book covers the essential concepts, terms, and history of cultural anthropology, introducing students to the widely accepted fundamentals and providing a foundation that can be enriched by the use of ethnographies, a reader, articles, lectures, field-based activities, and other kinds of supplements. It balances concise coverage of essential content with a commitment to an active, learner-centered pedagogy.

Race Monogamy And Other Lies They Told You

Author : Agustín Fuentes
ISBN : 9780520951679
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 89.26 MB
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There are three major myths of human nature: humans are divided into biological races; humans are naturally aggressive; men and women are truly different in behavior, desires, and wiring. In an engaging and wide-ranging narrative Agustín Fuentes counters these pervasive and pernicious myths about human behavior. Tackling misconceptions about what race, aggression, and sex really mean for humans, Fuentes incorporates an accessible understanding of culture, genetics, and evolution requiring us to dispose of notions of "nature or nurture." Presenting scientific evidence from diverse fields, including anthropology, biology, and psychology, Fuentes devises a myth-busting toolkit to dismantle persistent fallacies about the validity of biological races, the innateness of aggression and violence, and the nature of monogamy and differences between the sexes. A final chapter plus an appendix provide a set of take-home points on how readers can myth-bust on their own. Accessible, compelling, and original, this book is a rich and nuanced account of how nature, culture, experience, and choice interact to influence human behavior.
Category: Social Science

Why Humans Have Cultures

Author : Michael Carrithers
ISBN : 0192892118
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 23.90 MB
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Why do humans have such diverse cultures and ways of life? Michael Carrithers presents an original and powerful answer to this central problem of anthropology, arguing that it is the ways in which people interact, rather than technological advances, that have been of crucial importance in human history. Lucid and thought-provoking, he draws both on ancient and contemporary examples to show how this perspective forms a firm foundation for the study of culture, society, and history.
Category: Social Science

Cultural Anthropology

Author : Jack David Eller
ISBN : 9781317428183
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 63.45 MB
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Cultural Anthropology: Global Forces, Local Lives presents all the key areas of cultural anthropology as well as providing original and nuanced coverage of current and cutting-edge topics. An exceptionally clear and readable introduction, it helps students understand the application of anthropological concepts to the contemporary world and everyday life. Thorough treatment is given throughout the text to issues such as globalization, colonialism, ethnicity, nationalism, neoliberalism, and the state. Changes for the third edition include a brand new chapter on medical anthropology and an updated range of cases studies with a fresh thematic focus on China. The book contains a number of features to support student learning, including: A wealth of color images Definitions of key terms and further reading suggestions in the margins Summaries at the end of every chapter An extensive glossary, bibliography and index. Further resources are provided via a comprehensive companion website.
Category: Social Science

Wired For Culture Origins Of The Human Social Mind

Author : Mark Pagel
ISBN : 9780393063158
Genre : Science
File Size : 24.87 MB
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“Does an excellent job of using evolutionary biology to discuss the origins of religion, music, art, and . . . morality.”—Publishers Weekly, starred review A unique trait of the human species is that our personalities, lifestyles, and worldviews are shaped by an accident of birth—namely, the culture into which we are born. It is our cultures and not our genes that determine which foods we eat, which languages we speak, which people we love and marry, and which people we kill in war. But how did our species develop a mind that is hardwired for culture—and why? Evolutionary biologist Mark Pagel tracks this intriguing question through the last 80,000 years of human evolution, revealing how an innate propensity to contribute and conform to the culture of our birth not only enabled human survival and progress in the past but also continues to influence our behavior today. Shedding light on our species’ defining attributes—from art, morality, and altruism to self-interest, deception, and prejudice—Wired for Culture offers surprising new insights into what it means to be human.
Category: Science


Author : William H. Durham
ISBN : 0804721564
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 46.17 MB
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Charles Darwin's "On the Origins of Species" had two principal goals: to show that species had not been separately created and to show that natural selection had been the main force behind their proliferation and descent from common ancestors. In "Coevolution," the author proposes a powerful new theory of cultural evolution--that is, of the descent with modification of the shared conceptual systems we call "cultures"--that is parallel in many ways to Darwin's theory of organic evolution. The author suggests that a process of cultural selection, or preservation by preference, driven chiefly by choice or imposition depending on the circumstances, has been the main but not exclusive force of cultural change. He shows that this process gives rise to five major patterns or "modes" in which cultural change is at odds with genetic change. Each of the five modes is discussed in some detail and its existence confirmed through one or more case studies chosen for their heuristic value, the robustness of their data, and their broader implications. But "Coevolution" predicts not simply the existence of the five modes of gene-culture relations; it also predicts their relative importance in the ongoing dynamics of cultural change in particular cases. The case studies themselves are lucid and innovative reexaminations of an array of oft-pondered anthropological topics--plural marriage, sickle-cell anemia, basic color terms, adult lactose absorption, incest taboos, headhunting, and cannibalism. In a general case, the author's goal is to demonstrate that an evolutionary analysis of both genes and culture has much to contribute to our understanding of human diversity, particularly behavioral diversity, and thus to the resolution of age-old questions about nature and nurture, genes and culture.
Category: Social Science

Our Origins

Author : Clark Spencer Larsen
ISBN : 0393284905
Genre :
File Size : 88.27 MB
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