AFRICAN AMERICAN DOCTORS OF WORLD WAR I THE LIVES OF 104 VOLUNTEERS

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African American Doctors Of World War I

Author : W. Douglas Fisher
ISBN : 9781476663159
Genre : History
File Size : 77.89 MB
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A century ago, during the Jim Crow era, 104 African American doctors joined the United States Army to care for the 40,000 men of the 92nd and 93rd Divisions, the Army's only black combat units. The infantry regiments of the 93rd arrived first and were turned over to the French to fill gaps in their decimated lines. The 92nd Division came later and fought alongside other American fighting units. Some of those doctors rose to prominence and many were recognized for their achievements and contributions. Others died young or later succumbed to the economic and social challenges of the times. Most died before the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s. Beginning with their assignment to the Medical Officers Training Camp (Colored)--the only one in U.S. history--this book covers the early years, education and war experiences of these physicians, as well as their careers in the black communities of early 20th century America.
Category: History

African American Army Officers Of World War I

Author : Adam P. Wilson
ISBN : 9781476620077
Genre : History
File Size : 50.5 MB
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In April 1917, Congress approved President Woodrow Wilson's request to declare war on the Central Powers, thrusting the United States into World War I with the rallying cry, "The world must be made safe for democracy." Two months later 1,250 African American men--college graduates, businessmen, doctors, lawyers, reverends and non-commissioned officers--volunteered to become the first blacks to receive officer training at Fort Des Moines, Iowa. Denied the full privileges and protections of democracy at home, they prepared to defend it abroad in hopes that their service would be rewarded with equal citizenship at war's end. This book tells the stories of these black American soldiers' lives during training, in combat and after their return home. The author addresses issues of national and international racism and equality and discusses the Army's use of African American troops, the creation of a segregated officer training camp, the war's implications for civil rights in America, and military duty as an obligation of citizenship.
Category: History

Jimi Hendrix And The Cultural Politics Of Popular Music

Author : Aaron Lefkovitz
ISBN : 9783319770130
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 46.80 MB
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This book, on Jimi Hendrix’s life, times, visual-cultural prominence, and popular music, with a particular emphasis on Hendrix’s relationships to the cultural politics of race, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, class, and nation. Hendrix, an itinerant “Gypsy” and “Voodoo child” whose racialized “freak” visual image continues to internationally circulate, exploited the exoticism of his race, gender, and sexuality and Gypsy and Voodoo transnational political cultures and religion. Aaron E. Lefkovitz argues that Hendrix can be located in a legacy of black-transnational popular musicians, from Chuck Berry to the hip hop duo Outkast, confirming while subverting established white supremacist and hetero-normative codes and conventions. Focusing on Hendrix’s transnational biography and centrality to US and international visual cultural and popular music histories, this book links Hendrix to traditions of blackface minstrelsy, international freak show spectacles, black popular music’s global circulation, and visual-cultural racial, gender, and sexual stereotypes, while noting Hendrix’s place in 1960s countercultural, US-exceptionalist, cultural Cold War, and rock histories.
Category: Social Science

African American Hospitals In North Carolina

Author : Phoebe Ann Pollitt
ISBN : 9781476667249
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 37.30 MB
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 Untold thousands of black North Carolinians suffered or died during the Jim Crow era because they were denied admittance to white-only hospitals. With little money, scant opportunities for professional education and few white allies, African American physicians, nurses and other community leaders created their own hospitals, schools of nursing and public health outreach efforts. The author chronicles the important but largely unknown histories of more than 35 hospitals, the Leonard Medical School and 11 hospital-based schools of nursing established in North Carolina, and recounts the decades-long struggle for equal access to care and equal opportunities for African American health care professionals.
Category: Social Science

Chaplains Of The Revolutionary War

Author : Jack Darrell Crowder
ISBN : 9781476630717
Genre : History
File Size : 59.63 MB
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 “There is a time to preach and a time to fight. And now is the time to fight.” With those words, the Rev. John Muhlenberg stepped from his pulpit, removed his clerical robe—revealing the uniform of a Colonial officer—and marched off to war. Many of the ministers who became chaplains in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War carried muskets while ministering to the spiritual needs of the troops. Their eyewitness accounts describe the battles of Lexington and Concord, life on a prison ship, the burning of New York City, the Battle of Rhode Island, the execution of Major Andre, and many other events.
Category: History

Samurai Assassins

Author : Romulus Hillsborough
ISBN : 9781476628004
Genre : History
File Size : 88.27 MB
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Assassination—in Japanese, ansatsu or “dark murder”—was instrumental in the samurai-led revolution known as the Meiji Restoration, by which the shogun’s military government was overthrown and the Imperial monarchy restored in 1868. The ideology and moral philosophy of the men behind the revolution—including bushidō or “the way of the warrior”—informed their actions and would become the foundation of the emperor-worship of World War II. This first-ever account in English of the assassins who drove the revolution details one of the most volatile periods in Japanese history—also known as “the dawn of modern Japan.”
Category: History

British Chess Literature To 1914

Author : Tim Harding
ISBN : 9781476631691
Genre : Games & Activities
File Size : 52.8 MB
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 A huge amount was published about chess in the United Kingdom before the First World War. The growing popularity of chess in Victorian Britain was reflected in an increasingly competitive market of books and periodicals aimed at players from beginner to expert. The author combines new information about the early history of the game with advice for researchers into chess history and traces the further development of chess literature well into the 20th century. Topics include today’s leading chess libraries and the use of digitized chess texts and research on the Web. Special attention is given to the columns that appeared in newspapers (national and provincial) and magazines from 1813 onwards. These articles, usually weekly, provide a wealth of information on early chess, much of which is not to be found elsewhere. The lengthy first appendix, an A to Z of almost 600 chess columns, constitutes a detailed research aid. Other appendices include corrections and supplements to standard works of reference on chess.
Category: Games & Activities

An Extraordinary Ordinary Woman

Author : Susan M. Ouellette
ISBN : 9781438464978
Genre : History
File Size : 23.76 MB
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A rare nineteenth-century journal of an everyday woman richly infused with the minutiae of antebellum daily life and work. In 1820, Phebe Orvis began a journal that she faithfully kept for a decade. Richly detailed, her diary captures not only the everyday life of an ordinary woman in early nineteenth-century Vermont and New York, but also the unusual happenings of her family, neighborhood, and beyond. The journal entries trace Orvis’s transition from single life to marriage and motherhood, including her time at the Middlebury Female Seminary and her observations about the changing social and economic environment of the period. A Quaker, Orvis also recorded the details of the waxing passion of the Second Great Awakening in the people around her, as well as the conflict the fervor caused within her own family. In the first section of the book, Susan M. Ouellette includes a series of essays that illuminate Orvis’s diary entries and broaden the social landscape she inhabited. These essays focus on Orvis and, more importantly, the experience of ordinary people as they navigated the new nation, the new century, and the emerging American society and culture. The second section is a transcript of the original journal. This combination of analytical essays and primary source material offers readers a unique perspective of domestic life in northern New England as well as upstate New York in the early nineteenth century. “Ouellette’s chronicle offers the reader a beautifully crafted and richly textured account of ten years in the life of a young woman as she transitions from unmarried to married life on the New York and Vermont frontier. In the hands of Ouellette, the diary of Phebe Orvis is interpreted with skill and grace, and her life experiences are firmly grounded in the vibrant world of post-revolutionary America. This engaging work will be liked by those readers seeking a deeper understanding of the lives of women and family in the Early Republic as well as those interested in the history of New York, Vermont, and the American frontier.” — Jacqueline Barbara Carr, author of After the Siege: A Social History of Boston, 1775–1800 “Unraveling intricate threads from a young woman’s nineteenth-century diary, Ouellette deftly weaves them into a picture of life in northern Vermont and New York during the Early Republic. Themes of life, death, courting, marriage, travels, fears, and yearnings jump off the pages as Ouellette works her magic not only bringing Phebe Orvis to life but also using the diary and other primary sources to place Phebe’s life within the larger context of her times, gender, and social class. A wonderful read.” — Elise A. Guyette, author of Discovering Black Vermont: African American Farmers in Hinesburgh, 1790–1890
Category: History

The American Foreign Legion

Author : Frank Roberts
ISBN : 9781612515069
Genre : History
File Size : 33.60 MB
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Still segregated in World War I, the U.S. Army was reluctant to use its 93d division of black soldiers in combat and instead assigned the division's three National Guard and one draftee regiments to the French Army. The battlefield successes of these African Americans under the French at the height of the German offensives in 1918 turned white expectations of failure upside down. Their bravery and heroism gained the respect of French and German alike and called into question the U.S. Army's policy of racially segregating its divisions. The full story of their accomplishments is told here for the first time through the eyes of the enlisted men and their white and black officers. The book highlights the actions of individuals as well as the various units of the 93d in compelling combat scenes. We join Company C of the 370th Infantry under heavy fire as they capture artillery pieces, machine guns, and even a portion of a railroad track to win a unit citation and the Croix de Guerre. We learn about the extraordinary actions of Corporal Freddie Stowers, the only African American in the war to be nominated for-and seventy years later awarded-the Medal of Honor, and others who earned the Distinguished Service Cross and French awards for gallantry in combat. Their story of overcoming the odds at a time when most believed blacks performed poorly in combat is told by Frank Roberts, who has been researching the subject for years. While his book acknowledges the many problems encountered by the 93d, the focus is on the many triumphs of these tenacious soldiers as they fought the enemy and the prejudices of their fellow Americans. This book is published in cooperation with the Association of the United States Army.
Category: History