A WOMAN S CRUSADE

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A Woman S Crusade

Author : Mary Walton
ISBN : 0230111416
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 64.78 MB
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Alice Paul began her life as a studious girl from a strict Quaker family in New Jersey. In 1907, a scholarship took her to England, where she developed a passionate devotion to the suffrage movement. Upon her return to the United States, Alice became the leader of the militant wing of the American suffrage movement. Calling themselves "Silent Sentinels," she and her followers were the first protestors to picket the White House. Arrested and jailed, they went on hunger strikes and were force-fed and brutalized. Years before Gandhi's campaign of nonviolent resistance, and decades before civil rights demonstrations, Alice Paul practiced peaceful civil disobedience in the pursuit of equal rights for women. With her daring and unconventional tactics, Alice Paul eventually succeeded in forcing President Woodrow Wilson and a reluctant U.S. Congress to pass the Nineteenth Amendment, granting women the right to vote. Here at last is the inspiring story of the young woman whose dedication to women's rights made that long-held dream a reality.
Category: Biography & Autobiography

Phyllis Schlafly And Grassroots Conservatism

Author : Donald T. Critchlow
ISBN : 9780691187976
Genre : History
File Size : 30.71 MB
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Longtime activist, author, and antifeminist leader Phyllis Schlafly is for many the symbol of the conservative movement in America. In this provocative new book, historian Donald T. Critchlow sheds new light on Schlafly's life and on the unappreciated role her grassroots activism played in transforming America's political landscape. Based on exclusive and unrestricted access to Schlafly's papers as well as sixty other archival collections, the book reveals for the first time the inside story of this Missouri-born mother of six who became one of the most controversial forces in modern political history. It takes us from Schlafly's political beginnings in the Republican Right after the World War II through her years as an anticommunist crusader to her more recent efforts to thwart same-sex marriage and stem the flow of illegal immigrants. Schlafly's political career took off after her book A Choice Not an Echo helped secure Barry Goldwater's nomination. With sales of more than 3 million copies, the book established her as a national voice within the conservative movement. But it was Schlafly's bid to defeat the Equal Rights Amendment that gained her a grassroots following. Her anti-ERA crusade attracted hundreds of thousands of women into the conservative fold and earned her a name as feminism's most ardent opponent. In the 1970s, Schlafly founded the Eagle Forum, a Washington-based conservative policy organization that today claims a membership of 50,000 women. Filled with fresh insights into these and other initiatives, Phyllis Schlafly and Grassroots Conservatism provides a telling profile of one of the most influential activists in recent history. Sure to invite spirited debate, it casts new light on a major shift in American politics, the emergence of the Republican Right.
Category: History

Ardent Complaints And Equivocal Piety

Author : William E. Jackson
ISBN : 0761825509
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 54.98 MB
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Ardent Complaints and Equivocal Piety treats three sets of medieval German crusade poems, in most of which the crusades are pictured as a source of distress, disenchantment, or even annoyance. These groups of German poems are treated against a background of Latin crusade poems in which the crusades cause stress and distress of a different kind.
Category: Literary Criticism

The Women S Movements In The United States And Britain From The 1790s To The 1920s

Author : Christine Bolt
ISBN : 9781317867296
Genre : History
File Size : 28.43 MB
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This book presents a study of the development of the feminist movement in Britain and America during the 19th century. Acknowledging the similar social conditions in both countries during that period, the author suggests that a real sense of distinctiveness did exist between British and American feminists. American feminists were inspired by their own perception of the superiority of their social circumstances, for example, whereas British feminists found their cause complicated by traditional considerations of class. Christine Bolt aims to show that the story of the American and British women's movement is one of national distinctiveness within an international cause. This book should be of interest to students and teachers of American and British political history and women's studies.
Category: History

Through Sunshine And Shadow

Author : Sharon Anne Cook
ISBN : 9780773565401
Genre : Religion
File Size : 72.80 MB
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Using an extensive array of primary sources, including local WCTU minute books and correspondence, Cook describes the origins, structures, strategies, and achievements of the Ontario WCTU in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. She discusses the importance of its positions on such issues as Social Purity, women's franchise, the appropriate role of single women, working women's rights, the treatment of female offenders, and the effect of the WCTU's youth work. Cook traces the empowerment of women in the WCTU to the union's evangelical roots, arguing that the views of the Ontario WCTU were grounded in a vision of society that based the development of a moral society on the family unit and its moral centre, the mother.
Category: Religion

Endless Crusade

Author : Ellen Fitzpatrick
ISBN : 9780195358483
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 44.13 MB
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This book examines the lives and careers of four American women--Sophonisba Breckinridge, Edith Abbott, Katharine Bement Davis, and Frances Kellor--who played decisive roles in early twentieth-century reform crusades. Breckinridge and Abbott used their educations in political science and political economy to expose the tragic conditions endured by the urban poor. Davis became the first superintendent of the New York State Reformatory at Bedford Hills and was a leading figure in prison reform. Kellor's sociological training gained her admittance to the smoke-filled rooms of national party politics and eventually to a high-ranking position in the Progressive Party. In Endless Crusade, Fitzpatrick follows these four women from their collective experience as University of Chicago graduate students at the turn of the century to their extraordinary careers as early-twentieth-century social activists, exploring the impact of their academic training and their experiences as professional women on issues ranging from prison reform to Progressive Party politics. Fitzpatrick examines how each woman struggled, in various settings, to promote effective social reform. Their shared commitment to social knowledge and social change, she shows, helped to shape the character of early-twentieth-century reform.
Category: Social Science