Darrell M. WestBillionaires: Reflection on the Upper Crust

Brookings Institution Press, 2014

by Heath Brown on October 20, 2014

Darrell M. West

View on Amazon

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] So how many billionaires are there in the world? And what do they have to do with politics? Darrell  M. West has answered those questions in Billionaires: Reflection on the Upper Crust (Brookings 2014). West is vice president of Governance Studies and director of the Center for Technology Innovation at the Brookings Institution.

As an election approaches, the role of money and politics is fresh on everyone’s mind. Darrell West takes this issue on at its zenith. He examines the relationship of the 1,645 men and women global billionaires to politics in the US and elsewhere. What he discovers likely confirms some of the greatest fears of many who lament elite politics. But West’s book is not simply a screed against wealth; he shows the different ways money has entered into policy-making process through new models of philanthropy and efforts to curb corruption. He offers recommendations in the book’s conclusion to address the inadequacies in our current system of campaign finance regulation and transparency laws that might limit some of the harmful effects of too much money in politics.

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Matthew HuberLifeblood: Oil, Freedom, and the Forces of Capital

October 17, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Geography]  Lifeblood: Oil, Freedom, and the Forces of Capital (University of Minnesota Press, 2013) is an incisive look into how oil permeates our lives and helped shape American politics during the twentieth century. Author Matthew Huber shows the crucial role oil and housing policy played in the New Deal and how, in subsequent decades, government [...]

Read the full article →

Heather MenziesReclaiming the Commons for the Common Good: A Memoir and Manifesto

October 6, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Journalism] The Canadian author and scholar, Heather Menzies, has written a book about the journey she took to the highlands of Scotland in search of her ancestral roots. In Reclaiming the Commons for the Common Good: A Memoir & Manifesto (New Society Publishers, 2014), Menzies outlines her discovery of a vanished way of life [...]

Read the full article →

Philip KretsedemasMigrants and Race in the US: Territorial Racism and the Alien/Outside

September 29, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] Philip Kretsedemas is the author of Migrants and Race in the US: Territorial Racism and the Alien/Outside (Routledge, 2014). Kretsedemas is associate professor of sociology at University of Massachusetts-Boston. This is the second time he has been featured on New Books in Political Science podcast. In Migrants and Race in the US, Kretsedemas explains [...]

Read the full article →

Hahrie HanHow Organizations Develop Activists: Civic Associations & Leadership in the Twenty-First Century

September 22, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] Hahrie Han has written How Organizations Develop Activists: Civic Associations & Leadership in the Twenty-First Century (Oxford UP, 2014). Han is associate professor of political science at Wellesley College. She has previously written Groundbreakers: How Obama’s 2.2 Million Volunteers Transformed Campaigns in America. Han’s book explores the world of activism, and the role organizations [...]

Read the full article →

Jonathan SwartsConstructing Neoliberalism: Economic Transformation in Anglo-American Democracies

September 22, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Journalism]  The new book, Constructing Neoliberalism: Economic Transformation in Anglo-American Democracies (University of Toronto Press, 2013) shows how political elites in Britain, New Zealand, Australia and Canada successfully introduced radically new economic policies in the 1980s. While opinion polls have consistently showed that neoliberal policies are not popular, governments in all four countries have [...]

Read the full article →

Richard StarrEqual As Citizens: The Tumultuous and Troubled History of a Great Canadian Idea

September 11, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Journalism] ”We are not half a dozen provinces. We are one great Dominion,” Canada’s first Prime Minister, John A. Macdonald proudly declared. More than a century later, Canada has 10 provinces and three northern territories making it one of the biggest and richest countries on Earth. In the spirit of optimism that [...]

Read the full article →

Julia AzariDelivering the People’s Message: The Changing Politics of the Presidential Mandate

September 8, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] Julia Azari has written Delivering the People’s Message: The Changing Politics of the Presidential Mandate (Cornell University Press, 2014). Azari is assistant professor of political science at Marquette University. What was President Obama’s mandate when he was elected in 2008? Did that mandate extend to 2012? We commonly think that mandates attach to [...]

Read the full article →

Michael S. RothBeyond the University: Why Liberal Education Matters

September 7, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Education] With a new focus on vocational and work ready education, the notion of a liberal education is becoming less valued in American society. Though, there are still defenders of this well-rounded and classic form of education. One staunch defender is Dr. Michael S. Roth, current President of Wesleyan University and author [...]

Read the full article →

Glenn FeldmanNation within a Nation: The American South and the Federal Government

August 18, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] Glenn Feldman is the editor of Nation within a Nation: The American South and the Federal Government (University Press of Florida, 2014). Feldman is professor of history at the University of Alabama, Birmingham. He is the author or editor of numerous books, including Painting Dixie Red: When, Where, Why, and How the South Became [...]

Read the full article →